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Reviewers:
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7.3
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8/10 4/27/17 4:12 am
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8.9
Story Count: 2
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Top Rated Stories 1-10

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 4/23/17 3:01 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A competent, effective, but unremarkable story. The characters are colorful but lacking in depth. The story is well-plotted but a little too straightforward. There's nothing particularly wrong with any of it, but it's a bit too by-the-numbers for me. Two things that do work very well are the atmosphere and the backstory. The claustrophobic atmosphere is very effective. The backstory is, if anything, more interesting than the main story, and it is subsequently explored in the Cyberman series.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
3
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: nukirisameReview Date: 4/22/17 9:12 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Sirens of Time is a pretty poor start to the Monthly Range. In a few ways it's an understandable first foot forward; its format of one Doctor, one episode eases both the actors back into their roles and the listeners through the transition from TV to audio. The plot is very typical for 90s Who and, while a bit meh, at least gives Big Finish a good jumping off point, though at times it can make the story feel less like a company's production and more like the fanfiction it originally was.

The first episode, starring McCoy, is by far the weakest and I really don't know why they began with it (the idea of this being someone's first experience with Big Finish really worries me). A bog-standard alien world, a cackling pantomime villain... McCoy seems much more disjointed from his role than Davison or Baker, so he isn't able to carry the entire thing by himself. The ending seems to expect you to be invested in a character that had maybe 10 lines total, and all of them were sarcastic quips. The second episode is Davison's and is my personal favourite. It's nothing more than the Doctor getting himself captured and trying to leave, yes, but with its length it doesn't really need to be more. It's the kind of light little story I was expecting.

Baker's third episode completes the set by being mostly average - it has interesting concepts that are, of course, not explored enough, but it does give Baker enough material to get into the role and prove himself to be more than the weaker link people at the time might've expected. The final episode is, again, very 90s Who - but not in the bombastic way it usually is. It's a bit of a slump with a lot of exposition and not enough action. It has a nice amount of banter between the three Doctors but even that is missing its usual spark, as if the actors weren't having that much fun with it.

Everything about The Sirens of Time screams a patchy pilot release by a company trying to find its feet. It isn't godawful or anything but there's definitely more bad than good in this one. 4/10.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 4/20/17 1:13 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I've never understood the popularity of this one. While there isn't anything egregiously wrong with it, it's really not terribly good either. The story has some interesting ideas, and the script takes a good stab of using the Triskele to explore human psychology, but it's done in a fairly superficial way, and the story isn't very dynamic or engaging. It's actually pretty slow and plodding, and the Triskele don't ever present much of a threat. Worst of all, the decision to open the story with four minutes of the Doctor talking to himself was sheer madness.

Then there's Charley... the good news is that she is an instantly engaging character, and India Fisher does a wonderful job of bringing her to life. It's immediately obvious that she's going to make a wonderful companion and a perfect match for Paul McGann's Doctor. The bad news is that the ongoing story that this story is trying to set-up doesn't make any sense. We just have to take it on faith that Charley surviving the R101 disaster is some kind of terrible problem, but there's no apparent reason why it should be. If Lord Tamworth can run off with the Triskele, why can't Charley run off with the Doctor? As far as this individual story is concerned, it's just one plot hole, but this particular plot hole happens to be the key point in an ongoing storyline. Charley's entire story arc is built up out of this plot hole.

Evelyn should have been given Charley's story arc. It would have worked for Evelyn.If you go back and listen closely to "The Marian Conspiracy", you'll notice that her whole existence is one giant bootstrap paradox. The Doctor learns her family history, travels back in time, and then through his deliberate interference creates that history based on his foreknowledge of it. Her whole existence is a product of the Doctor's willful interference. She should have been the one the Time Lords wanted to kill. It would have made a lot more sense. It doesn't work for Charley at all.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 4/19/17 1:04 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Bloated, rambling, and hopelessly overwrought. Like The Apocalypse Element, this story takes advantage of the audio format's potential to do large-scale stories. The threat of the story is a planet-sized swarm of wasp-like creatures flying through space and devouring planets. Presenting such a daunting, implacable enemy is a great way to open a story, but Briggs's script fails to capitalize on it. The story gets lost in a tortured, convoluted plot built around another annoying time paradox and resolved, again, by the whole story un-happening. At this point in Big Finish's output, Nicholas Briggs has contributed two stories, neither of which actually happened, and neither one worth the time it takes to listen to.

The idea of the Doctor teaming up with the Daleks to defeat something even more dangerous is a strong one, and Big Finish will explore it again down the road in much stronger stories than this one.

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