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< 81. The Kingmaker
83. Something Inside >

82. The Settling

Rating Votes
10
12%
13
9
17%
18
8
38%
40
7
12%
13
6
14%
15
5
3%
3
4
4%
4
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.8
Votes
106
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
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Reviewed By: BrainofMorbius23Review Date: 7/12/18 2:27 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Another great historical, dark and dramatic this one. A great struggle for hex as he gets intertwined in a dangerous historical moment.

I won’t say much but this is one of the most solid ace / hex adventures so far. I’m sure plenty are to come !
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 9/18/17 6:25 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

I rarely notice the music unless its especially prominent. It's one of my blind-spots, so to speak. Whether it's TV, movies, or Big Finish audios, the music usually just slips by underneath the level of conscious awareness. I hear it, of course, and it manipulates my emotions. I just rarely notice it.

In the case of "The Settling", the music is one of the most memorable things about it. And that's saying something, because "The Settling" is an outstanding story with much to recommend it. But the music deserves special notice, I think. There's something terribly relentless and oppressive about those drums. They manage to convey something of the hopeless inevitability that infects the whole story. I don't think I'm going out on a limb to suggest that helplessness in the face of history is one of the prominent themes of the story, and the music really helps sell that. You hear those drums and you just know that terrible things are going to happen, and there's nothing anyone can do to stop it. There's an argument to be made that Hex was responsible, to a certain extent, for much of what happened. But I think it's more interesting see it all as a kind of fateful inevitability.

All right, so it's bleak, it's grim, and it's heavy, but it's also outstanding (and there are a few moments of warmth and even comedy along the way). Much credit must go the writer, of course, for delivering such a powerful script, but let me start with the actors. The core of this story is the relationship between Cromwell and Hex, which means Philip Olivier and Clive Mantle do most of the heavy lifting. Sophie Aldred, too, especially in the quiet, reflective scenes that make up the story's framing device. But mainly Olivier and Mantle, and they're just wonderful together. I've like Hex ever since "The Harvest". I thought he was a great character right from the start, and a great addition to the Doctor/Ace team. But this is the first time that Olivier has really impressed me. His performances have always been solid, more or less, but this is the first story since "The Harvest" that really made demands of him, and he absolutely shines.

But we mustn't forget the script. Guerrier does a fine job of introducing Cromwell in the first episode. He plays on Cromwell's reputation as a monster, only then to present a nuanced, complex character, who manages even to be sympathetic. It's not so much that Guerrier's Cromwell is not a monster, but that he's not merely a monster. He has a defensible point-of-view, and Guerrier's script allows him to present it. By the end of the story, neither Ace nor Hex quite knows what to make of him. I think that's the reaction Guerrier was trying to get out of the audience, and if so, it certainly worked in my case.

I think it's fair to say that the Doctor takes a bit of a back seat in this story, but he still has a prominent and quite interesting role to play. Putting him in the position of having to deliver a baby was a stroke of genius. There's something deeply incongruous about the seventh Doctor being called upon to do something as ordinary-yet-extraordinary as delivering a baby. After that, having him inspire innovations in medical technology is just a neat little bonus.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 7/16/17 6:23 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This story finds the Doctor, Ace, and Hex in Ireland during Oliver Cromwell's attempts to get it to submit to Parliament. It's a brilliant historical that manages to take a much-maligned character in Cromwell and make him complex and interesting. Sylvester McCoy has one of his better performances as he helps a war widow who is almost ready to deliver a baby. The store also manages to portray Ace and Hex's growing friendship even though they spend most of the story apart. This comes through some well-thought out

The music is stunning.It's beautiful yet mournful Irish melody that suits this piece perfectly. Overall, a beautifully done and enchanting historical.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 10/29/14 3:52 am
3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

This is possibly one of the best 7th Doctor's adventures I have heard to date. McCoy finally delivers on all fronts, and HEX and ACE are in this sublime, especially Phillip Oliver who puts a performance equal to the best, he truly is in a different class. To say however that this is a Doctor Who drama is a complete understatement, it isn't, it is a audio drama of incredibly high quality, both acting and production wise. The haunting music that accompanies the whole presentation is actually defining in it's looped backing of this, and adds a haunting almost lamentable quality to this whole peace. This is not an uplifting Doctor Who is more of a dramatic pause. It is not SCI-FI it is historic retelling using the genre as means of delivery. For me this is one of the standouts in a while for me from Big Finish.A synopsis of this to whet your appetite, is Doctor, Ace and Hex, are thrown into the Cromwell's barbaric slaughter of the Irish, it demonstrates the complete failing of the Cromwell as a man, and a failed leader of the anti royalist reign within Great Britain, you hear the unfaltering Cromwell, really start to debate his own self worth and his utter unwillingness to accept he is wrong, and the means by which he has lead his campaign and his methods to which he subscribes, be challenged, to the point where you actually start to see him not as a powerful, forceful, focused individual, start to waiver in everything he believes to be right. It must be said that Clive Mantle is a seriously heavy peace of thespian punch in this, and adds a really high quality gloss to this work. Two words to sum this up BUY IT