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< 39. Bang-Bang-A-Boom!
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40. Jubilee

Rating Votes
10
50%
104
9
22%
47
8
16%
34
7
5%
11
6
4%
8
5
0%
1
4
1%
3
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
1%
2
Average Rating
8.9
Votes
210
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User Rating:
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Reviewed By: comparestoreReview Date: 9/2/18 11:20 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Better than its TV counterpart 'Dalek', 'Jubilee' is a wonderfully disturbing story about how everyone is so used to Daleks that they become part of normal life. It's up to the Doctor and Evelyn to investigate this strange world and how they have somehow managed to save it from the Daleks in the past while also encountering a lone Dalek.

Colin Baker and Maggie Stables are, as usual, at the top of their game here, delivering some truly astonishing moments, in particular Evelyn's encounters with the Dalek and her encounter with the prisoner in the tower are incredibly emotional and Maggie pulls it off exceptionally well.

The unsettling nature of the commercialization of the Daleks adds more to the story and the creepy 'pet daleks' are especially disturbing.

A true masterpiece.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 6/29/17 1:33 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

I like to think of this story as Evelyn's "The Chimes of Midnight". I've written elsewhere that it really should have been Evelyn, not Charley, who got the big storyline about paradoxes threatening history. In the alternate universe where that happened, I imagine that "Jubilee" played the same role in Evelyn's arc that, here in the real world, "The Chimes of Midnight" played in Charley's arc. Both stories involve complicated paradoxes, and both stories leave this listener someone confused as to what, from the point of view of an outside historical observer, "really" happened.

And, of course, both stories were written by Robert Shearman. This story famously went on to inspire "Dalek" from the new series, also written by Shearman. "Dalek" focuses on one particularly powerful idea in "Jubilee" and constructs a complete story around it. "Jubilee" is positively bursting with ideas. As a result, "Dalek" is much smaller, but also much more tightly focused, than "Jubilee".

Of course, Shearman also wrote "The Holy Terror", which shares with "Jubilee" the striking combination of light-hearted comedy with remarkably nasty horror and violence. It's an effective combination, and especially chilling here. This story presents a very dark and twisted view of humanity, and gives us no one to blame but ourselves. In the alternate history this story imagines, the Doctor saved England from a Dalek invasion in 1903, and England used Dalek technology to create the monstrous society we see in the story.

I think the lynchpin for the whole story is Martin Jarvis's performance. Rochester is a complex character. Jarvis does a fine job of exploring his depths and contradictions.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
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10
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Reviewed By: JacobzReview Date: 5/24/17 8:00 pm
0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Brilliant! Every actor is on point, the writing keeps you in suspense the whole time, and that intro was fantastically clever.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 10/14/16 1:31 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Shearman's story tells of a dystopian world where humans destroyed the Daleks with the help of the Doctor and then became an autocratic society is brilliant and chilling. The actors are all on point with Colin Baker turning in a fascinating performance, along with Briggs as the Dalek.

The story has a great combination of dark comedy, piercing social commentary, and memorable characters. The release is known for being the basis for the TV episode, "Dalek," but it's more influential than that. The story has shaped the way most Doctor Who writers deal with the Daleks. Easily a must-listen.