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Reviews By XxDachshundxX
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# Ratings:
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Avg Rating:
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
2
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
2
Replay Rating:
1
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: XxDachshundxX Review Date: 7/15/19 7:56 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

This is truly awful. This story does look good on paper but fails to deliver when it comes to execution.

Firstly, it is boring. Nothing really happens of importance and when it happens, it is very slow and dull. The story doesn't get going until about 30 minutes in, the beginning of which is some light fluff that is enjoyable in a 'I wonder what's going to happen next' way, which of course doesn't deliver. Most of the story is either walking around a forest or in a tower standing around spouting meaningless dialogue that doesn't make sense. Even when action occurs, such as the scenes with the moving King and Queen, it is still slow and makes you sigh. When the ending comes, when it finally comes, that's boring too, and there's also a boring coda with Amy and Rory that further adds to Moffat's 'we waited for you' gimmick with his writing which itself is a lazy excuse for show, don't tell.

Secondly, there's some really dreadful directing here. I'm really sad to say that because director Farren Blackburn (his only Doctor Who credit for a reason) directed the best episode of Vera, The Crow Trap. Maybe it is because he is used to directing serious dramas, but what he got the actors and everyone else to do was dreadful. I liked Claire Skinner in her role, but the way she was made to deliver her lines was deplorable. I don't think kids can act believably most of the time and the child actors here back up my argument. But Blackburn didn't even have the kids look surprised when they stepped through the present! I count the direction here almost as bad as stories like Sleep No More and The Ghost Monument.

Thirdly, it further proves that Steven Moffat relies too much upon gimmicks. This was a few years before Hell Bent, but he's putting Androzani Major in a story, not because it needs to be set there, but because it's a cheap namedrop. The characters in that weird ship don't do anything and only exist, again, as gimmicks. The stuff with the housekeeper, the concept of the TARDIS being a wardrobe, the present being a portal, the King and Queen, WW I, Amy and Rory, it is all gimmicky and don't actually do anything to the plot! And what furthers my point is that if you take away these gimmicks, there is no plot. I do like that this is based off The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe which was my favourite childhood story. But again, no relevance.

Plot hole: the kids don't appear to age.

There are a few good things about this story though. I loved the sets and I enjoyed the wintry atmosphere. But this one is just dull, badly directed and full of gimmicks, with little to recommend.

2/10
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: XxDachshundxX Review Date: 7/12/19 9:16 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

When I was told that The Confessions of Dorian Gray, a series that I'd always wanted to hear, was free to listen on Spotify, I dropped what I was doing, grabbed my headphone and lay down to listen to the first instalment, This World Our Hell. And wow.

Just wow.

In one thirty minute sitting, we are delivered a character who is, to all extents, perfectly crafted. He is charming, smart, philosophical, yet ruthless and cunning, and having a large mystery about him. His past is teased out to us and us, the audience, wonder whether this really is the 'hero' of the narrative. Even though we know nothing about him, we feel as though we have always known him.

Not much happens and it feels very much like an episode of The Magnus Archives (another free online series that I also recommend). But what does happen is of incredibly important and is really interesting. As someone who has read the original Dorian Gray novel, I loved the set up with Oscar Wilde and his backstory with Dorian. It made for a great scene.

And the absolute creepiness and menace of the monsters when they come is horrifying. I cringed so hard when the horror moment comes because it really hits you that this is real adult drama.

If I have one criticism, it is that I felt as though more should have happened in this story for it to 100% work as a pilot story, maybe one more scene, even if it was just padding. But that doesn't bother me too much because the story is delivered well enough in its format.

I am going to continue with this thought provoking and well-written series, as I am very curious to see where it goes. Already, I believe that it is one of the best premises I have experienced.

9.5/10
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: XxDachshundxX Review Date: 7/10/19 7:43 am
5 out of 5 found this review helpful.

Night of the Stormcrow is an excellent Hinchcliffe-esque story for the Fourth Doctor. I'm honestly surprised that it doesn't get more love, as it is a wonderful example of Doctor Who done well.

There's a base under siege, in this case, the observatory. There's an ever-approaching scary monster that hasn't been seen but you can feel its presence. The supporting characters interact with one another and are impacted upon by fear of this creature. And the Doctor and his companion turn up...

The cast are excellent, the effects are brilliant, the writing is incredible. But what has to be commended is the incredible monster in the Stormcrow. It's an excellent creation of Marc Platt and a real psychological threat.

There's horror, there's humour, there's suspense, there's everything that is good in Doctor Who. And the cover art is magical. Honestly, I can't recommend this enough. It's a great listen, especially in the Christmas season.

10/10

Appendix:
I've just noticed that this is the 9000th review on The Time Scales. Wow...and to another 9000!
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: XxDachshundxX Review Date: 7/10/19 7:36 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This is an excellent story, a proper return of Doctor Who to television.

Rose is a great story that introduces us to the 9th Doctor through the eyes of the new companion Rose. She is excellently played by Billie Piper, who I believe is one of the greatest companions in Doctor Who (at least Series One Rose, but that's for another time). It's really refreshing to have a well-crafted character like her and it's very enjoyable seeing her life.

As soon as it starts, it's fast paced and full of action. It never really stops, save for a few occasions when a reflective pause is needed. Compared to the slower-paced stories of the Classic series (which are also amazing and have their place), this feels really new.

I think it's a great idea to bring back the Autons for this story and they sure are scary! I love all the Auton stories, this one included. They are used here in a very menacing way and it works great.

The Ninth Doctor is introduced expertly here and is shown to be unlike all other Doctors. He is funny, yet mysterious and dark. Christopher Eccleston plays him spectacularly, and it's a real injustice we never got a second season with him.

If nothing else, this story is a triumphant return of Doctor Who to television.

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