Stories:
2949
Members:
741
Submitted Reviews:
8573
Reviewers:
349
< 2.3 - Brave New Town
2.5 - Grand Theft Cosmos >

2.4 - The Skull of Sobek

Rating Votes
10
2%
2
9
1%
1
8
6%
7
7
12%
13
6
26%
29
5
27%
30
4
24%
27
3
1%
1
2
0%
0
1
1%
1
Average Rating
5.5
Votes
111
Director:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
3
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
1
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 5/6/19 3:03 am
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This may be my least favorite 8th Doctor story ever. You have a generic cult that worships the skull of Sobek, an ancient crocodile god. You might be asking yourself, "is that the same Sobek from Egyptian mythology?" but there's no tie-in to that. Instead the story takes place on a distant planet where everything is blue, not that it has anything to do with the plot. It's just blue and they mention it a few times. There are some fanatics outside of.the temple trying to get in because of visions or prophecies or whatever. We don't really get to know those people so it doesn't matter that much. They're just sort of out there. But the crocodile god thing that's going somewhere, right? It turns out there are croc men in the past, or another dimension or something, and they need to battle to the death using proxy people as champions. Why? I really don't know. I've listened to this story twice now and can't say if it's unclear or if I just checked out a little and missed it. Twice. And why are they fighting to begin with? Something about the skull told them to but they have forgotten?
I really don't know. Sheridan Smith tries her best to make due with the lackluster script but isn't enough to save this one, especially since Paul McGann more or less sleepwalks his way through it. I will be skipping it in any future relistens through the EDAs.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
2
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 3/21/15 12:37 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Unlike previous stories written by the genius Marc Platt, the Skull of Sobek proves to be my least favorite offering of his. Most of the guest cast is really boring to listen to and Paul McGann, not being interested in the script he is given, phones in his performance as the Eighth Doctor. This is a real problem with some of McGann's audios if he doesn't like the script. Sheridan Smith is the most enjoyable person to be seen in the story giving the quick wit of Lucie Miller even with the less than stellar material. This however isn't the worst audio and has a few moments. Honestly skip the story unless you are a completest like me or can listen to a few sparks and an interesting set of CD extras.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
4
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/12/15 10:04 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Skull of Sobek is a decent outing for the Eighth Doctor, but probably one of the weaker of the series as the Doctor arrives in a monastery. Much of it is dull stuff that's been done before, in particular an alien religion that seems to borrow the style of its liturgy from the Book of Common Prayers. Doctor Who writers, do you ever get tired of that trope? (See Face of Evil, Meglos)

Sheridan Smith is the saving grace of the entire production. Lucie Miller is great possessed but there's a nice reflective moment for her where she wonders if she's get used to all the death. I've been liking Lucie with each passing episode and that trend continues with this episode.

Still, Lucie and a few good elements save this story from being a fiasco like Minuet in Hell, but the result is merely okay.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 9/26/13 12:43 am
3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

I'm stumped by this title's standing as the lowest rated in the range (by a far sight, too). At worst, it feels like the whole thing's been run through the Who-o-Matic plot machine, but a lot of stories amount to little more than a rearrangement of familiar elements. And although I'm not here to make an impassioned plea for the defense, I will say in its favor that the story aims high. It really strives for an epic scope and a mood of Victorian horror that wouldn't seem out of place in the Hinchcliffe/Holmes era. Another feature that might appeal to some is how action-oriented this story is compared to others in the range. I suspect that anyone who likes the sound of all that and has the requisite ability to forgive a few lapses in internal logic will enjoy the ride.