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< 1.3 - Horror of Glam Rock
1.5 - Phobos >

1.4 - Immortal Beloved

Rating Votes
10
5%
7
9
14%
19
8
29%
40
7
25%
34
6
16%
22
5
7%
9
4
5%
7
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.3
Votes
138

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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 11/12/17 10:51 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

What a cast! Big Finish has been pulling impressive guest stars since the early days, but these BBC7 productions have really raised the bar. After treating us to Bernard Cribbins and Una Stubbs for "Horror of Glam Rock", this story gives us Ian McNeice and Elspet Gray.

And they've got great roles to play in another strong story. I think the 50-min, single episode approach (mirroring the format of the new series) is very effective, and this story uses it very well. It starts with a strong hook, develops it very effectively, and doesn't outstay it's welcome. In order to work in a standard, Main Range four-part format, this story would probably need a whole additional subplot. But this story *doesn't* need another subplot. It's fine as it is.

I also think Lucie steps up nicely in this story, and it's not like she's been holding back up until now. She started strong, and she has quickly established herself as one of the great companions. Lucie Miller is very much a co-lead (as Rose Tyler was), rather than just a sidekick. No offense to sidekicks, and Big Finish was writing companions well years before the new series came around, but Lucie Miller is another big step forward, thanks to great writing and Sheridan Smith's performance.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: JacobzReview Date: 9/30/16 5:10 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Paul McGann is bitingly witty and earnest, Sheridan Smith's Lucie says whatever is on her mind, Ian McNiece is affabley yet horrifically evil, Elspet Gray is charming, and Jake McGann is adorably cheesy in his debut role. The story premise is extremely clever (I find it somewhat shocking that I've never seen Doctor Who attempt a similar premise before), and it is taken to its full potential. The music is also great and the twists and turns are satisfying. The ending feels a tad rushed, but overall this is a great story, worthy of a place among the best Eighth Doctor stories I've ever experienced.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 3/16/15 5:53 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Jonathan Clements is a relatively unknown author to me so it was a real risk to listen to one of his Doctor Who outings in Immortal Beloved. I wasn't impressed with his script. It brings up an interesting idea for a storyline with cloned humans as the Greek gods on an Earth colony, but none of the interesting portions of the Greek gods powers are explored. I can understand that a lot of it is people calling technology power of gods it doesn't work as well.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/11/15 10:51 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This fourth episode of the Eighth Doctor Adventures finds the doctor and Lucien landing on a planet where the founders of a human colony have extended their life through using clones and setting themselves up as the Greek Pantheon.

Paul McGann does a great job in giving the doctor the moral authority this type of episode requires. Lucie began to grow on me as well. The ethical issues that the series raises remain quite timely.

The episode was lacking in action and the peril seemed a little distant. However the concept and acting were solid.