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< 20. Loups-Garoux
22. Bloodtide >

21. Dust Breeding

Rating Votes
10
5%
7
9
11%
16
8
20%
30
7
35%
53
6
22%
33
5
5%
8
4
3%
5
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
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Average Rating
7.1
Votes
152
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: SeblemReview Date: 3/3/19 5:05 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The setting is great. I love stories about art and a dust planet is just a great visual. Great performances by the main cast and especially Mark Donovan as Klemp! The plot kept me interested throughout.

One issue for me is still the portrayal of 7 and Ace in Big Finish stories. They both act just sillier than they did on TV and McCoy isn't given as much menace here. 7 was often silly Doctor in the TV Show also but then we got to see McCoy's physical acting shine through and at the end of a story you still always knew that you didn't want to cross him.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 5/19/17 10:24 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

There's a scene in Part Three where the Master chastises Madame Salvadori for being so blinded by greed that she never even bothered to investigate the background of his mysterious alter-ego, Mr. Seta. The trouble with this scene is that Madame Salvadori has investigated Mr. Seta's background, but the Master made certain that she wouldn't learn anything. This isn't a huge problem, but it's an example of what I find so frustrating about Tucker's writing. The dialogue sounds like typical "Doctor Who" style adventure-story dialogue, but it isn't actually connected to the goals or desires of the characters. It's just there to move the plot along and hit the right notes along the way. The Master talks like a "Doctor Who" villain because he is a "Doctor Who" villain. That's about the level of depth you get from a Mike Tucker script.

After giving us mysterious living water and mysterious living stone, this story features mysterious living dust. Still, it's probably the strongest of the three. The story works well on paper, and there are a lot of good ideas in here. The sound design is good too... you can almost hear that screaming Dalek... The backstory of the superweapon is very interesting, and I like how Guthrie's backstory plays into the denouement. But the story overall is a muddled mess. Between the Master, the Krill, and the Scream, the story is just too busy.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 6/6/16 6:45 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Dust Breeding is full to the brim with brilliant ideas that author Mike Tucker brings to the table more than his original play, The Genocide Machine. The plot reveals that throughout his life the Doctor has been stealing paintings as soon as they go missing to preserve the art and how this allows him to discover a creature living in “The Scream” by painter Edvard Munch a la the six fake Mona Lisa’s in City of Death. This becomes part of a plot with the Master who is teaming up with the Krill, an alien created by Tucker and Perry for the novel Storm Harvest, to restore his body by harvesting this creature on a dust planet. There is also an intergalactic art convention with a mad artist melding his body with the dust for his art and a comedic woman running the place played by Liz Shaw actress, Caroline John. The audio itself is too cluttered for its own good trying to combine so many different ideas that it takes a lot to keep everything straight in your head. I’ve never read any of Tucker’s novel work, but as most of his work has been with Robert Perry I feel Tucker is the idea and character man while Perry actually does the plot structure. This is evident in Dust Breeding just because of how cluttered everything is even though the characters shine through.





The Doctor and Ace have characterization on par with that seen in The Fearmonger and they feel more like they were equals during this story. Ace in particular has her own subplot where she gets to be independent of the Doctor and Sophie Aldred pulls it off. While it is obvious Aldred has aged I think her voice works better on audio than it would have if this was still 1989. Some of her delivery is off in places. Ace has a few good cracks at the Doctor and questions the morality of stealing paintings. Sadly that debate is never really resolved as the plot continues on without any real looking back on previously established conflict.





The villain of the piece is the Master with Geoffrey Beevers making a quiet return as the character post Survival. Tucker goes into nice enough detail about what happens but don’t expect it to make it the perfect resolution with the books and how David A. McIntee saw him post Survival. It also makes it hell to keep track of the different versions of the Master as Beevers has two incarnations now. Nothing on Beevers however as he is brilliant and you won’t see the Master coming as the alias is perfect. He teams up with the Krill who are an interesting idea for a villain even though they don’t do much.





The side characters are varied with Guthrie basically being the mysterious old man who gets a few laughs. There is the return of Bev Tarrent from The Genocide Machine who works better here when she isn’t a carbon copy of Benny. She would steal the show if it wasn’t for Damien who is the camp secondary villain and Madame Salvadori who is Caroline John let off her leash and allowed to go full pantomime. The rest of the characters are rather dull and unforgettable and Tucker falls into the same traps of The Genocide Machine with great ideas, but a badly structured plot. It doesn’t help that the music for the story is also forgettable even if I can praise its sound design for just being great.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 6/1/16 10:38 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The story has some creepy and well-done concepts baked and the first cliffhanger brilliantly includes a corpse whose blood has been replaced by dust. The truth behind this is very clever and well-crated. In addition, we're introduced to the weird case of an artist colony founded on a wasteland planet and possessing several great works of art. On top of this, Geoffrey Beavers makes a splash as we get to hear the Master for the first time in Big Finish.

On the downside, there are a few over the top moments with a bit of shoutyness. I also didn't liek the idea that the Doctor uses time travel to steal paintings from museums just before they burn down so that he can add them to his art collection. The behavior's so unlike the Doctor that it's something the Meddling Monk does in the Eighth Doctor Adventures.

Still, despite its problems, the release is solid, and it's helped by a solid performance from Ian Ricketts as Guthrie.