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Vampire Science >

The Eight Doctors

Rating Votes
10
6%
1
9
6%
1
8
13%
2
7
31%
5
6
6%
1
5
13%
2
4
19%
3
3
6%
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1
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Average Rating
6.3
Votes
16
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Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 2/4/19 11:01 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Eight Doctors opens with a small prologue setting the novel right at the end of the TV Movie. The Doctor has left Earth and finds himself back in the room with the Eye of Harmony where the Master has laid one final trap for his archenemy, something to make him lose his memory so he has to cross his timestream to earlier adventures and the paradox it causes will for whatever reason restore the memories up to that point. There’s also a subplot on Gallifrey where President Flavia (not the previously established President Romana) and a bunch of Time Lords watch in awe and horror as the Doctor travels his path. Ryoth, a Time Lord of the Celestial Intervention Agency, uses a Timescoop in an attempt to stop the Doctor but is eaten by a Drashig halfway through the novel. He’s supposed to be the villain of the piece, but as he dies halfway through and without much interference from the other Time Lords, the back half of the novel is without a real villain. The first segment takes the Doctor to where it all began, the I.M. Foreman junkyard. This time it’s the 1990s where poor vegetarian Samantha Jones is being attacked by some drug dealers because she’s an informant on the evils of crack cocaine. It becomes readily apparent that Terrance Dicks cannot write for an anti-drug PSA as the first few chapters try to be, so much so that they end with Sam in danger and the Doctor abandoning her. Yeah, this is not a good start to the novel as Sam is made out to be our new companion with a weak characterization as annoying vegetarian and activist. There is no sense of personality with Sam, no sense of humor or chemistry with the Doctor leaving the audience no drive to see if the Doctor is going to save her in the end.



After the segment at Coal Hill School, we go through the Doctors chronologically, starting with a rendezvous with the First Doctor during the events of An Unearthly Child. The scene is the forest of fear and the caveman Za is injured; the Doctor, Ian, Barbara, and Susan are escaping the tribe of Gum and the reader can guess where this is going. The Doctor is about to commit a murder so he can escape and the Eighth Doctor comes in to stop him. It’s a quick little sequence as well as the sequence with the Second Doctor, set during The War Games where the Doctor must call in the Time Lords to help with beating the War Lords plan. Both as segments Dicks is able to make them both easy to read, but nothing is above average in the characterization and the plot leaves much to be desired. The Third Doctor’s segment however is the weakest of the novel, taking place after The Sea Devils. It can be accurately described as a redo of the ending of The Daemons where the Master finds his TARDIS and escapes, whilst the Doctor acts horribly to Jo and everyone around him. Odd considering Terrance Dicks was script editor for the Third Doctor and novelized much of the novels of the Third and Fourth Doctors.



The section of the Fourth Doctor is one of the highlights, taking place in the closing moments of Dicks’ own State of Decay. The Doctor and Romana are lured away from the TARDIS and in the midst of a cult of vampires wishing to make the Time Lords their new king and queen. The Eighth Doctor shows up and begins to get in on the vampire slaying action as well as giving the Fourth Doctor some of his blood to stave off death at Logopolis. Terrance Dicks obviously enjoyed writing this one because the quality of the short passages shines through the rest of the book’s problems. The Fifth Doctor’s section doesn’t work however as it’s another continuity fest with Raston Warrior Robots, Sontarans, and Drashigs. Most of all, it is a dull segment of the book, overshadowed by the Sixth Doctor’s segment. The Ultimate Foe is the setting of the penultimate segment where the Doctors have to uncover the conspiracy to kill the Doctor over the course of the Trial with the Valeyard. The Sixth Doctor is a bit out of character being portrayed as just a fatty at points, but it’s at least enjoyable and close to his television counterpart. I shall not comment on my favorite Doctor’s portion as it really isn’t a plot and just happens. Then the book is over and we can get on to something better.
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Reviewed By: nukirisameReview Date: 9/18/18 11:18 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

It was a brave idea; starting off a range of new novels, meant to continue the legacy of the show, and have the first novel deride the new direction the series was heading in the first few pages and spend the rest of its time glorifying the past. What a great first impression.

To be fair, if all you care about is nostalgia, this book certainly has it. The Pertwee portions are a particular highlight in how well they recreate the era (Up until (spoiler) the Third Doctor threatens to kill his future self and steal his TARDIS. What.). It's as a first foot forward that this fails. Badly. Eight is reduced to a blank slate instead of making you invested in him. The new companion gets one or two chapters dedicated to introducing her (which revolves around a drug bust because... complex adult plots, I suppose), plus a little sequence at the end which is so vapid and generic I managed to get a laugh out of it. You can really tell Terrance wrote it at the very last minute.

If you want a light read that feels like classic Who, go for it. If you want a novel that does something new, skip ahead to Vampire Science. That's where the EDAs really begin.
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Reviewed By: EightsGirlReview Date: 6/12/17 2:50 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Overall, this book is enjoyable for all the Classic Who references. Taking place right after the movie, Eight must visit all his former selves in order to regain his memories. It's not a terrible book and I get why they wrote it (feeling the need to bridge the gap and all) but it's sort of just meh. The best parts are of him with Sam and that's all of maybe 20 pages. This one can be skipped unless OCD demands you read in order (me haha)
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User Rating:
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Reviewed By: TheBigChurroReview Date: 5/15/17 11:55 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Eight Doctors starts off the EDAs with a great, semi-by the books story. The Master sets a trap for the Doctor and the novel is basically getting out of the trap.
The Doctor loses all his memories and he has to work his way from the beginning of his time stream to get all of it back, meeting all of his previous incarnations individually, restoring all memories up to that point in the time stream, its a simple idea that I don't think had been done before but Uncle Terrance takes full advantage of it. Although he is a bit cheeky by placing the events around mostly stories either he wrote or had some contribution towards (The War Games, The Daemons, The Sea Devils, State of Decay, The Five Doctors) and then having an original point for the Seventh Doctor, not to much before the events of the TV Movie.
I do enjoy all the nods and references to past stories and overall Who lore, and all the stuff set on Gallifrey about the CIA conspiracy that I hope the EDA range will delve into with further novels (currently starting the marathon :) ).
One of the only problems I had was some of the mini-adventures are too long, e.g the Fourth and Sixth Doctor, both have very interesting plot points within their chapters (SPOILER: The blood transfusion and 6's struggle to prove his innocence and his feelings are shown very nicely by Dick's: SPOILER ENDS), I don't feel that some parts are unnecessary, they just take away from the general fast pace of the novel; you'll be very excited and motivated by the references with the Second and Third Doctor chapters only to have some boring world building in the Fourth Doctor's chapters.
New companion Samantha Jones is briefly in the novel, at the start and conclusion, because this story is primarily about the Doctor.
In conclusion, this novel does start start off safe and it executes it very good, and is a great starting point for Doctor Who novels, and it sets up my anticipation for the EDAs very well.
Overall: 8/10