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< 2.5 - Grand Theft Cosmos
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2.6 - The Zygon Who Fell to Earth

Rating Votes
10
16%
18
9
22%
25
8
28%
32
7
16%
18
6
11%
13
5
4%
4
4
4%
4
3
0%
0
2
0%
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1
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Average Rating
7.9
Votes
114

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
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NR
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Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 1/22/17 4:24 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Another reviewer, Newt, rightfully points out that going in - the Zygon who fell to earth oughtn't work on paper with its terrible premise - a Zygon (figuratively) falling to earth, before falling in love and 'going native'. Reminiscent of No More Lies, I was expecting the usual trite plot beats and a wholly unsatisfying attempt to pull at the heart strings.

What a delight that the story actually ended with my struggling to recall a more enjoyable EDA! Making the most of the shorter format, the significant other of our Zygon Trevor, is Auntie Pat from Season 1's Glam Rock. As a result we cruise straight into the story, with no messing. Its assumed we 'get' the Zygons and given the cover and title, there's no attempt to shock the audience with their introduction. Furthermore, they're played for laughs, bringing (as is discussed in the interviews) a fresh take that significantly subverts expectations, being a retelling of Terror of the Zygons.

Popping comic dialogue; solid character arcs; subverted expectations and some lovely character moments thrown in - the story taking place in the Lakes, with some borderline hokey, but utterly lovely, Wordsworthian flourishes.

There are definitely a few gripes. As I've complained often, whereas the main range often subtlety engages in political commentary or satire, the EDA's and FDA's come to think of it, engage in political moralising. It's not only irritating to see writers make the Doctor pick sides in contemporary issues the character ought to be above - but it also leads to some cringe inducing exposition, often to the detriment of plot beats or internal logic and credibility of the story. Toning down the politics of the writers really ought to be a priority of the script editors, fortunately this seems to have kicked in and isn't an issue in the more recent shorter releases (Dark Eyes, War Doctor etc.).

The ending too left me cold. After a cracking resolution - with both plot and emotional beats working together, we're given a morally and ethically uncomfortable finish. Following the 'wait - he's not dead, really!' snag, akin to the worst excesses of New Who, it's uncomfortable to ponder the ramifications of Trevor's macabre body-swapping. The extras point out the potential insofar as it places the Doctor in a real quandary, This would've been spectacular drama, but unfortunately the story runs out of time, leaving far too little time to mull over the ethics of what's just taken place.

Gripes aside, its a genuinely funny and heart warming (and breaking) little story. Well, well worth your time and a real gem of the EDA's thus far.

Just to conclude with a snipe at New Who - THIS, Zygon Invasion / Inversion, is how to tell a subversive piece of your villains having the potential to be more than simply monsters!
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 3/22/15 12:02 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Zygon Who Fell to Earth is an audio play that takes one of the worst conceived premises for a story. Paul Magrs unknowingly takes the basic premise of the horrible teen "romance" phenomenon known as the Twilight Saga, but instead of being an overly long, badly written, four "novel" and five "film" series, full of unlikeable characters and a plot that can be summed up in five minutes, this play could be considered the anti-Twilight. The basic plot of the play is that in 1979 Lucie's Auntie Pat fell in love with a man called Trevor who turns out to be a Zygon, sent to Earth around the same time as those in Terror of the Zygons. The twist here is that Trevor has gone native and doesn't wish to destroy the Earth. He even falls in love with Auntie Pat, they get married and run a hotel by a lake together to live happily ever after. Doesn't that sound just like a certain "romance" series we all know. Think about it. Girl falls for boy, boy falls for girl, boy turns out to be a monster, girl doesn't care and will do anything to stay with boy, they get married, boy's species turns up to try and stop their relationship. However what Twilight does wrong in every aspect Doctor Who gets right. Where Twilight dumbs down the monster part this story keeps Trevor a Zygon by having the other Zygons there to show they are still evil. It also helps that the characters are all completely likeable and the romance between Pat and Trevor is believable. Also on a final note the ending is something to be heard because it is a very sad and moving one.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
4
Replay Rating:
2
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/12/15 10:09 am
1 out of 3 found this review helpful.

This story of a Zygon warlord marrying an Earth woman and going native and the efforts of his crew to bring him back to the old Zygon war. The production has its good points The music is solid. Sheridan Smith turns in a great performance as the Zygon impersonator of Lucie as well as the regular Lucie.

The story fails for several reasons. First, the Doctor is essentially useless in this tale and with Lucie being replaced by a Zygon early on, her actual contributions to the story are nil as well. Which would be fine if the rest of the cast could carry the story, but they can't. The story wants to have a light tone, but it just doesn't. There's nothing that happens that's all that clever. The idea of interspecies relationships as some metaphor for human sexuality is a theme that's been explored to death and this adds nothing new. A better example of this was actually in the previous season's Phobas.

The ending was contrived. It cleverly avoids a timey wimey event and from what I've heard, does set up key events in the Doctor's future. But even if the end result of the story is necessary for the Eighth Doctor's story, it could be better done.

The story also is weakened by trying to have three separate messages. There's not only the interspecies subtext, there's also a huge ecological subtext, and for the progressive hat trick, a slam on the 1980s.

Unfortunately, the story really got lost in these messages.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: MTLReview Date: 6/11/11 12:38 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Hmm not Paul Margs' best work unfortunately. Until the final confrontations on a ship, there is a lot of clunky, expositionary and uninteresting dialogue. The story seems to drag forward predictably and the Doctor is strangely useless - he seems quite stupid and acts very prejugingly, very unusual for this usual cavalier explorer persona.

However the ideas keep it above average - Trevor and Pat's relationship is brilliantly depicted by both script and actors. Pat's characterisation undergoes inredible development from her previous appearance and she looks like a very strong character. The Zygons are also used very well, even the Skarasen.

Unusually, the great stuff is all in the latter half and doesn't feel as rushed as many other Who stories do. Not one I'm desperate to re-listen to but no travesty
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