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< 6.1 - The Skeleton Quay
6.3 - Military Intelligence >

6.2 - Return of the Repressed

Rating Votes
10
11%
4
9
8%
3
8
29%
11
7
26%
10
6
11%
4
5
11%
4
4
5%
2
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
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Average Rating
7.3
Votes
38
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/3/15 7:40 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

I wouldn't say Return of the Repressed was your ordinary run of the mill Jago and Litefoot because it really, really isn't. The story is centred around Jago's visits to renowned psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. This story doesn't do anything to service the series' story arcs, and is much more geared towards comedy. It also has a postmodern feel a bit like the preceding series.

Adrian Lukis as Sigmund Freud is too silly, and the tone of the episode is more cartoon than caricature. This has to be my least favourite of the series due to the and over the top nature of the whole thing. Howard Carter's music provided great gravitas that counterbalanced the light heartedness of The Skeleton Quay, but in this episode it serves to play off the lighter moments. That being said, there is still fun to be had listening to the exchanges and interplay between George and the Baboon. As usual for the range, there are plenty of little nuances that reward a second listen.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 8/8/15 12:02 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This psychological examination of Jago and Litefoot featuring Doctor Freud is brilliantly written by Matthew Sweet. The story begins with Henry telling Freud of his dreams and then those dreams end up coming to life.

The story has some great humorous moments and for once, Professor Litefoot provides them. At the same, it provides some insight into who Jago and Litefoot are. Overall, this is another weird and wonderful tale from the pen of Matthew Sweet.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 7/18/14 7:13 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The Story is a little complex, it is a dream within a dream, recalled by Jago to of all people Freud. The story is not the sort that you can listen to whilst not giving it 100% concentration, it needs to be carefully listened too, there are some clever nuances and it plays on the relative knowledge that you have listened to the previous story. The addition of the Baboon as some sort of catalyst for Jago's dreamscape is interesting. I found that I needed to listen to the story twice to make sure that I had not misunderstood the story held within.

This is the one story which I think plays with a different feel than most J&L stories. Still stirling and enthralling tale to listen too.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 10/22/13 11:33 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

I found this one hard to rate as I am absolutely certain it will be better on the second listen.

It began by just being weird without us knowing the reason. I find nothing wrong with that, it happens quite often in this medium, but 80% of the way through the story and I still didn't know what was happening. Jago had no idea and Litefoot was lost as well. The presence of Sigmund Freud didn't help either and it seemed the only one who did know what was going on was a baboon. Actually the baboon didn't seem to have any idea either, but as that is normal for a baboon, I count the baboon as the most informed character of the story. It made no sense right up until the moment that it did make sense.

I actually spent most f the story wondering why we haven't heard from Ellie yet this series. I even had to check the cast to make sure she is still there. Its not like Lisa would stop playing the part, but I still had to check.

I also have to say I do love the Victorian setting. It hasn't aged.