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< Benjamin & Baxter
6.2 - Return of the Repressed >

6.1 - The Skeleton Quay

Rating Votes
10
9%
4
9
23%
10
8
34%
15
7
23%
10
6
7%
3
5
0%
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4
5%
2
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Average Rating
7.9
Votes
44
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/3/15 6:40 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

As soon as Jago & Litefoot return to Victorian London they are greeted by an employee of the Mysterious Colonel. We are never told how they knew our intrepid investigators would be there, and they are soon whisked off on an errand for Queen and country. Upon arrival in Shingle Cove they make the acquaintance of Isaac Pawley, a local fisherman, and Camilla Tevelyan, owner of the local docks. Our dynamic duo also start forgetting their preceding adventures with the Doctor and the events of series five.

This story funny, engaging and well plotted, but as always with the Jago and Litefoot range it's the details that really make this. The effects, music, dialogue and nuances in the performances really make this a joy to listen to. In addition to the usual cast Keith Bartlett's performance as the deadpan Isaac Pawley is the kind of thing that you would only expect to hear in a Jago and Litefoot episode, and is the perfect foil for the gentlemanly Litefoot and bumbling Jago. Jonathan Morris takes advantage of the change of setting and introduction of new characters to weave a sense of mystery and gently tease us with the identity of the villain. Only two to choose from, but both are equally enigmatic;there are plenty of apparitions and strange goings on.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 8/7/15 12:51 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

After excursions in the TARDIS and travels to the Groovy 1960s, Writer Jonathan Morris returns Jago and Litefoot to the Victorian era with a vengeance.

The Skeleton of Quay is perhaps the most authentically Victorian story Jago and Litefooot has ever told. Other stories feel like good modern writers writing about the Victorian era. However, most of this story (with the exception of a couple sci-fi elements) feels like it could have been written in the 1890s or early 1900s. It's got a perfect and relaxed pacing to build eerie atmosphere.

The story also features the beginnings of Jago and Litefoot forgetting their travels with the Doctor and also their adventures in the 1960s. I have mixed feelings on this.I think forgetting the 1960s is probably for the best as they wouldn't be the same characters if they knew what was going to happen for the next 70+ years. On the other hand, it's unfortunate that they don't remember their adventures with the Doctor.

Overall though, this is a wonderful episode that is a great, "Welcome home." for these two characters.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: RyanOM1991Review Date: 8/31/14 7:15 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Traditional, eerie and atmospheric. An engaging tale.

Jago and Litefoot are back to their roots in Victorian England, this time apparently working for the Crown.

The first plaudit that has to be given to this episode is its simplistic but well-constructed storyline. It plays out as a mystery with supernatural elements, which are inevitably given a more scientific explanation towards the end. It's a simple story but it is written so well that it draws the listener in. Big Finish sometimes uses more convoluted story lines as a means of engaging the listener, but it takes a great writer to deliver a simple story that does the same job.

The entire cast delivers a first-rate performance. In some ways, the performances are reminiscent of Counter-Measures, in that these characters actually sound like real people. It's easy to actually care and take interest in them.

The seaside soundscapes are excellent and very atmospheric, although some of the interior scenes tend to lack ambience. A very minor quibble.

The tragic nature of the story is effectively realised. It's easy to care about the villagers, despite never actually really encountering them within the story. Another sign of fantastic writing.

All in all, a solid and engaging tale from a great writer.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 7/17/14 10:43 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

It goes from strength to strength, with this series of audio adventures. The quality from the off is there, in fact, I think they are now much more polished than ever. Have throughly enjoyed the series so far, and this continuation of the stories of Jago and Litefoot continue to be as good as ever.

This sees the return of our two loveable detectives, thrown into an adventure on the bequest of the Queen herself. Classic smugglers, and ghosts of a town lost to the sea abounds, soundscape as always is stunning. Mists and ruined town by the sea add to the overall story line. Excellent I do not want to spoil it for anyone, but if you are a fan, this is well up to the mark, and in some respects move it up another notch in terms of quality, interplay and entertainment.