Stories:
2139
Members:
655
Submitted Reviews:
5148
Reviewers:
259
< 7. A Storm of Angels

8. The Masters of War

Rating Votes
10
25%
16
9
11%
7
8
35%
22
7
10%
6
6
10%
6
5
3%
2
4
2%
1
3
0%
0
2
2%
1
1
3%
2
Average Rating
7.9
Votes
63

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 9/27/15 7:09 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

'Masters of War' was written by Eddie Robinson and directed by Jason Haigh-Ellery. 'The Unbound' has dealt with alternate Doctor’s and what if scenario's, and has been one of the most entertaining Big Finish ranges with its many highs and lows. 'Masters of War' is the sequel to 'Sympathy for the Devil'. This is my favourite of the 'Unbound' range, it’s more balanced than either 'Auld Mortality' or 'Deadline' and has the same inventive story telling that made those titles so great.

The Doctor has decided to take his new friend Alistair on a trip and after have a time of it they end up on Skaro. After agreeing to help the Thals fight the Daleks the Doctor discovers the existence of Davros the long lost Dalek creator. The Doctor and Alistair capture a Dalek and re-programme it to think it's Davros causing infighting between Daleks that can't decide whether Davros has undergone full Dalek conversion. While the Daleks squabble and fight our heroes strike, but there is a surprise visit to the planet from the Quatch. The Quatch are beings from another dimension.

Nicholas Courtney is the Brigadier, doesn't matter which version he just is. David Warner on the other hand feels like an archetypal classic series Doctor even though he never was. So the Doctor creates a divide in the Dalek society then allies himself with the Daleks to stop them allying with the Quatch who have formed a union with Davros. Groups are splintering everywhere and there is a final wedge to driven yet. This Doctor is a master manipulator and although like our third Doctor this incarnation is more steely. Davros played by Molloy is an alternate version as are the Daleks. These versions are ostensibly the same but with differences. The casting is faultless, not just the main characters who are mostly played by their original actors but also the supporting actors. The music and production values are consistent with the rest of the range but the Quatch voices are ridiculously quiet at times. The Quatch grew on me over the course of the story, as the hand they played in the Daleks creation became clearer.

Each story of the range has tried to present us with a moral dilemma, what if scenario or perhaps both. In this one Davros has had a problem with his creations. If he removed all pity his creations turned on him or turned away from him, but with pity they lacked the killer instinct and became in his eyes weak. There is some great dialogue because of the philosophising, and the story has more depth because of it. The Doctor realises he may have misjudged the Daleks who re-invaded Skaro to try and protect the Thals from the coming Quatch invasion.

Lots going on and some nice ideas, but still the writer fall back on the human strength of acting illogically defeating superior logic as a battle strategy. I have enjoyed this series very much; this one is definitely epic and very good indeed whilst retaining a lot of familiar facets of a Daleks story it also allows us to see things in a different light.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 5/21/15 9:20 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

To start with, the cover image is perfect. You see three three faces and expect you'll get a clash of these three strong leaders.
What you also get is an alternative Skaro as a backdrop which is well painted with some well rounded Thall characters and some Daleks that don't behave quite as expected. That's fine though as this is an alternative 3rd Doctor, so a lot of what we know of the daleks, he does not and it may not even happen in this paradigm.
This becomes the first meeting with Davros, so again what we know must be stripped away so we can experience a different first meeting between the characters.
All in, this is a long story, but a solid one filled with well crafted scenes and characters.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/23/15 6:18 am
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

One of only two sequels to the alternate Earth scenarios posed by the Doctor Who Unbound series, Masters of War finds the alternate Third Doctor (David Warner) and his companion retired Brigadier Lethrbridge Stewart landing on Skaro, the homeworld of the Daleks and the Thals to once again find the Daleks are ruling the planet, but these Daleks are acting very differently. The Doctor seeks to once again free the Thals, but soon both Daleks and Thals will have to cope with a far greater threat.

The one complaint critics have raised is that this is a very long production, essentially being two one-hour episodes. For my money, it merits every minute of it. This story explores a lot of themes and presents an alternate take on the Genesis of the Daleks. At the end of Genesis of the Daleks, Davros is destroyed by the Daleks because he didn't program them with pity. But in this world, Davros gave some Daleks pity and these remained with him and while the Daleks were still fascists, they were benevolent fascists who came back to protect the Thals by taking over Skaro and forcing the Thals to aid in their own defense. In essence, the main universe Daleks are more like Nazis, these are like a well-intentioned colonial power subjugating native peoples "for their own good".

This take on the Daleks is fascinating and it allows you to see the Daleks and Thals in a new light. These Daleks seem more courageous and less like xenophobic. We also see the Thals great weakness and that is their lack of courage. The Thals seems less like well-meaning peaceniks we met in the very first Dalek serial and more like people who simply lack the nerve to protect their own freedom which led them to conscript the Kaleds to fight their alien enemies, which led to Davros' crippling which led to the creatuibDaleks.

David Warner is great as the Doctor, although kept out of action, a fact the Doctor himself acknowledged in the second episode and of course Nicholas Courtney stepped into being Alistair Lethbridge Stewart with ease. The Daleks really make this story shine, and it's a fascinating world that Eddie Robson's crafted. Overall, the Masters of War is a materful story and a must-hear program.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
NA
Acting Rating:
NA
Replay Rating:
NA
Effects Rating:
NA
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: Lie128Review Date: 6/11/12 11:57 am
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Just a really good story. I didn't believe there would be enough to spread over almost two and a half hours, but there was more than enough. While it isn't quite as good as sympathy for the devil, which you don't have too have listened to before. Davros feels a but underused, but this story is really about the daleks and thals than him or even the doctor and the brig. For one of Nicolas Courtneys last enchors for Doctor who, let alone Big finish, he really excells himself. This version is different to the one we know and love but he is just as brilliant as that version, just more battlescared from his Unit years. The doctor himself is great. It feels like we've had this version around for ever, he just fits into it so well. David Warners performance is brilliant, an actor that should be back before the 50th anniversery year.
Log in to submit Rating and Review.

Community