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< The Smugglers
The Power of the Daleks >

The Tenth Planet

Rating Votes
10
6%
6
9
18%
17
8
35%
33
7
25%
24
6
13%
12
5
2%
2
4
1%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.7
Votes
95
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Latest Community Reviews

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User Rating:
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Reviewed By: GuiannosReview Date: 4/24/19 11:18 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The first Cybermen story is important. Not only does it introduce one of Doctor Who's most iconic villains but it is the template for the "base under seige" stories that would be the norm for the next few seasons. It is also monumentally influential for including the Doctor's first on screen regeneration (*ahem* "renewal") and pioneering one of the defining aspects of both the character and the series to come. But, for all its importance does it stand the test of time as a story? Absolutely.

The plot is pretty hard sci-fi for its time centering around a rocket exploration of the solar system that reveals a mysterious planet on a collision course with Earth. At first glance the Cybermen could be Robomen (from the Dalek Invasion) in snowsuits with a few extra hoses and mechanical bobs. However, once they start speaking in that eerie singsongy mechanical voice they stand out. This is my favorite version of the creatures despite the cheap look of the costumes- the fabric coverings over the faces that have mechanical components but still an element of flesh and blood emphasize the lost humanity rather than inhumanity that the Cybermen represent. There's a stronger representation of mechanical augmentation to the flesh at play here that is lost with some of their more motorized chrome upgrades to come over the years. The result is creepy and memorable.

Cybermen aside, this is a slow burner of a story that builds a lot of quiet tension and makes good use of the remote and desolate setting. There is nowhere to escape and very limited options to try to resist the invasion. The acting of the main cast is strong with interesting characters in General Cutler and Dr. Barclay but the many supporting characters leave a lot to be desired, especially in the first part. It's a gripe that fades by midway through the story, though, as the Cybermen steal the show and a good portion of the screentime. By the countdown cliffhanger ending part 3 (easily a top 10 all time best for the show) the drama and sense of dread are palpable and the entire cast is on point. The end resolution of the threat is a bit of a fizzle after the build up but it's worthwhile for the ride.

It's a shame that the fourth part is lost. The animated reconstruction does a much better job of conveying the action in some of the quieter scenes than the old Loose Cannon reconstruction but it's still not quite the same as seeing the real thing, especially considering how iconic Hartnell's exit is.
From the Reviewer:
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Reviewed By: MercuryReview Date: 11/23/18 12:17 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This story from writer Kit Pedler is historic and thankfully the quality matches its importance. And important it really is because the idea of changing the actor playing the Doctor by having him 'regenerate' into a different version of the same character was incredible and untested. It is hard now to imagine how radical this idea was at the time. If it had failed Doctor Who would have been finished whereas as the time of writing it is 55 years to the day since the first episode braodcast with the show and most of its key elements still continuing as strongly as ever.

As a springboard for all that we have this is an excellent adventure which also has the historic first ever appearance by the Cybermen. I really like these prototype Cybermen and even their 'sing-song' voices. I think the concept behind them is great and the story itself has them involved in an exciting attempt to destroy humanity. Their unfeeling nature and the scares and action set them up as an iconic 'monster' to rival the Daleks.

All aspects of the production are very good indeed and any flaws are minor. The story unfortunately has the Doctor sidelined a lot of the time which was unnecessary and sad in Hartnell's last regular appearance. However, when he does get involved he is as good as ever, delivering his lines with his usual charisma and that magical touch Hartnell had for being somewhat other worldly and dangerous but also endearing and delightful.

This is a classic which all fans must see. All 4 episodes 10/10.

Average rating for all William Hartnell episodes Seasons 1-4: 8.26/10.
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Reviewed By: comparestoreReview Date: 9/2/18 8:41 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Fantastic introduction to the cybermen. This is their best variation in my opinion, they body-horror and general creepiness is off the charts.

Story wise, The Tenth Planet is a bit slow with a few stumbles, and nothing really happens for a bit, but it's worth it for the cybermen and the first ever regeneration.
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 11/24/15 11:27 pm
1 out of 3 found this review helpful.

There are two things that make this serial must-see: The introduction of the Cybermen and the first regeneration. Given those two key ingredients, it'd be fair to expect this to be a top rated serial.

However, the execution leaves something to be desired. The Doctor and his companions Polly and Ben land the South Pole where an international space command center is run by a stereotypical American general and the Doctor and companions are confined as a twin Planet of Earth appears and the Cybermen launch their invasion.

There was something interesting things going on but until the end of the second episode, this had little to do with even the companions. Polly at one point hangs around to make coffee while the Doctor faints for an entire episode and does or says very little in each episode with the exception of one impassioned speech on emotion in Episode 2. In addition, the whole resolution to the problem of the Cybermen is really weak.

The story does have some things working for it. There's mystery in the first two episodes, and Ben does have some good action in part 3 with a terrific cliffhanger to wrap that up. And Episode 4 features the first regeneration with the Doctor urging them to "keep warm" as a final charge before going to the TARDIS and changing into Patrick Troughton. Again, not bad, but could have been better.