Stories:
2866
Members:
727
Submitted Reviews:
8129
Reviewers:
339
< 7.4 -The Power of Three
7.6 - The Snowmen >

7.5 - The Angels Take Manhattan

Rating Votes
10
10%
10
9
16%
16
8
31%
32
7
15%
15
6
15%
15
5
6%
6
4
8%
8
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.4
Votes
102
Director:
Writer:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: Lilwink9632Review Date: 2/25/19 10:47 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I thought it was a fine episode through most of it. I think they used the book and differences in time very cleverly. I love seeing the different dynamics between characters. I was enjoying it until the end. For a very clever episode, I thought it ended tremendously unclearer in what I consider one of the most confusing companion departures in Doctor Who. Why can't they just take a plane to somewhere else and the Doctor pick them up there? Why can't he just pick them up in 1939 a year later? I really don't get it. I think it tried to get to clever and it ended up over complicating things. I thought there was great character moments, but I feel like an episode featuring the Weeping Angels should focus more on the angels themselves. They felt very background, despite the whole premise being around them, and I don't think that should be the case for when they use iconic monsters like the daleks or cybermen. I thought this was a good episode, but the confusing ending and the angels being background really made it take a hit for me unfortunately.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
3
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: MercuryReview Date: 2/11/19 1:12 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Amy and Rory sign off from their travels with the Doctor and their final episode is sadly typical of their entire time on the show i.e. full of exciting potential but blighted by repetitive death scenes and illogical plots. This episode effectively features Amy dying twice - her fall from the roof and her off screen death as an old lady - and 3 deaths for Rory - his death after being first sent back by the Angels, his fall from the roof and his off screen death after being sent back again by another Angel. Incredibly this means Amy has apparently died 6 times in the show (not including her flesh avatar being destroyed) and Rory has apparently died 7 times! When you add the 5 apparent deaths of the Doctor, the 4 apparent deaths or regenerations of River and the death of Oswin/Clara in her debut it means in the 33 episodes of the Moffatt era to this point there have been a total of 23 apparent deaths of TARDIS crew (including one future companion). That is extraordinary overuse of this plot device. It lessens the impact of death scenes as they keep getting magically undone, it is repetitive, lazy storytelling and it is just plain daft to keep doing it! The very next episode will feature a second death for Clara in her second ever appearance and she would, of course, return! This is one of the major problems I have with Moffatt.

Another even bigger problem I have with Moffatt is his disregard for logic and his insistence of a 'bigger is always better' attitude which causes him to over inflate story ideas and not bother ensuring things make sense. In this episode we have the Statue of Liberty becoming an Angel which is just silly. How could nobody notice it moving in such a hugely populated area? We have the timey wimey idea of River writing stories about events that the Doctor reads as things happen (but cannot read ahead in order to not fix events in an unwanted way). Well isn't it a ridiculous coincidence the Doctor chose, of his own free will, to randomly read these novels (it is mentioned he has read more than one), to read one at the time they are in Manhattan and to just notice events being about them when he happens to be reading it when they are at the exact right place and time?! It is not logical, it is totally contrived. The film-noir scene at the start is part of this contrivance too. It is purely for effect. The Doctor then travels back to ancient China and puts a message on a piece of pottery which River sees 1500 or so years later in the apartment she is visiting and spurs her to signal the Doctor. Eh?! How on Earth can the Doctor ensure a particular piece of pottery will arrive undamaged in the apartment 1500 years later?! It is Moffatt yet again throwing what he thinks is a cool bit of 'timey wimeyness' in which, as usual, makes no sense!! Why does River not get ransported when the Angel grabs her wrist? And why does Rory and Amy getting sent back in time by the Angels mean the Doctor cannot have any further contact with them? The paradox apparently means the Doctor can no longer visit Manhattan but the reason people who were sent back could not leave was because the Angels controlled the building they sent them to and stopped anyone leaving - which begged another question of how they survived to old age if they were stuck in one building with no food shopping etc - and we are told the paradox wiped that building and most Angels out so why can't Amy and Rory leave Manhattan and rejoin with the Doctor from another location? Even if we accept they are stuck in Manhattan why can River visit them but the Doctor can never speak to them again? Why can't he phone them or whatever at least? And why is it that once the Doctor heard the Brigadier died he could never see him again, when he heard Madame de Pompadour had died he could never see her again and when he knows how Amy and Rory die he can never see them in their adult timeline again but he CAN visit Amelia as a young girl and he CAN have contact with famous people from history whose death he is fully aware of such as Vincent Van Gogh. It is totally inconsistent! I guess it would make sense that when someone dies he can never see them again in an earlier part of their timeline to avoid possibly altering their future events that are known to him. But when he chooses he happily will alter known events anyway so he is not averse to taking such risks except when Moffatt decides he cannot see people anymore just because it suits the story. The rules are strictly kept to at times but thrown away when it suits.

These elements spoil what could and should have been a great episode. The acting is brilliant, the production looks really good with high standard effects, there are the creepy Angels who are a top class enemy and make scarily effective attacks on a few occasions, there is the emotional departure of two well loved companions and the Doctor's dismay at their loss, there is tension, suspense, excitement and smart dialogue with moments of funny humour. All ingredients which should make this a classic. But Moffatt's obsessions once again spoil the plot and even the Angels are made less scary by his insistence on overblowing ideas.

I will be fair as always and take into account all those good elements I mentioned which stop this being really poor but the problematic parts still keep this down as a disappointing 5.5/10 when it should have been a 10/10. What a shame.... again!
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: BrainofMorbius23Review Date: 9/8/18 8:56 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Amy and Rory get one of the most emotional send offs and I think in that this story has to be mentioned. Moffat however makes the error of using the angels one to many times. There reappearance in s5 was exciting but even then it was evident that they should be one hit wanders to maintain mystery and compelling threat.
Here in their third major appearance they are still gorgeous and creepy but the Statue of Liberty does someone bring me to cringing. Though I had no qualms with the creepy cherubs and that scene in the cellar with Rory is memorable.
I felt that Gold did well with his score in this story and the acting was lovely , particularly from our leads.

8/10 though flawed it holds a firm place simply for what it does in sending off two lovely companions and friends of the doctor
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/24/15 10:43 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

“Together. Or not at all,” this story brings to a close Amy and Rory’s time in the TARDIS and breaks the Doctor’s heart as well as that of the audience. The dramatic core of the episode is Rory facing death by weeping angels in 1930s Manhatten. The scene atop the building is emotionally packed and represents Amy’s best moment on the series as she makes her final choice between her travels with the Doctor and her love for Rory.

It’s a pity the rest of the episode doesn’t work as well. The story is full of over-grand set-ups and a sort of “bigger is better” mentality that has the absurd idea of the Statue of Liberty as a weeping angel. The dynamic between the Doctor and River is off. Moffat seems to rewrite the rules for how the Angels operate every episode and this is no exception. It’s not that everything in this episode is bad, but a lot of it is unnecessary. In isolation, I enjoyed the Film Noir opening with a hard boiled private eye wandering about Manhattan. It was stylistic, it was gorgeous, and well-done, but why was it there? It served to bury the lead and take time away from what we needed.

But, the emotional core is so strong that it holds the episode together despite its flaws. It’s a beautiful last bow for Amy and Roy with some great artistic moments. Such artistry deserved a more coherent story, but it’s still worthwhile watching.