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< Voyage to the New World
5.2 - The Case of the Gluttonous Guru >

5.1 - The Age of Revolution

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10
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9
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29
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Average Rating
8.0
Votes
52
Jago & Litefoot - Series 5
7.6
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User Rating:
8
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Acting Rating:
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Reviewed By: JMChurch25Review Date: 1/8/19 5:15 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Stuck in 1968 after the events of "Voyage to the New World", Series 5 begins a new and rather groovy set of stories for our Infernal Investigators, new and stylized theme tune and all. 'Age of Revolution' eases you in nicely with a fun soundscape and using the framing device of an investigator with a link to the past to re-introduce us to the main cast and what they've been up to. The first half of the story in this regard is absolutely stellar catching us up nicely with our leads but also giving them an aura of mystique that's very well earned at this point. But once gaps are filled in and we know what's been happening, the story delves into a mysterious disappearance tied into a strange statue that's completely in spirit to the saga but honestly rather dull. It manages to stay true to the style of J&L stories with a new setting certainly. But it's not one that you end up really invested in especially with elements that gave me flashbacks to "Invasion of the Dinosaurs" from the Pertwee era (and not in a good way) and a resolution by a somewhat tenuous plot point from a previous story that I couldn't remember happening. It doesn't hinder the audio itself too much as listening to this cast is always a joy. But I can't deny that I do find myself wishing for a better mystery to back up such a fantastic opening half. On the whole though, I really liked 'Age of Revolution', more than most opening stories I've heard with this team in fact. It's a very strong opener for what promises to be the most unique Jago and Litefoot set thus far and by the end, I was excited to hear more of what this series has to offer.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
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Replay Rating:
8
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9
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Reviewed By: C57Review Date: 12/22/17 1:12 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Includes a nice riff on the Kink's Village Green Preservation Society. High quality performances from the regular cast. Though some of the minor players are not altogether convincing. Light but fun.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
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8
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7
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9
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 6/15/15 9:24 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Age of Revolution finds Jago and Litefoot in the 1960s after the Doctor inadvertently drops them off more than 70 years in their future.

This story adjust to its setting quite nicely. It begins with a 1960s remix of the theme that sounds absolutely superb. Rather than beginning with an exposition of how they got to the 20th Century, they throw us right into the investigation of Detective Sergeant Sacker who is descended from a colleague of Litefoot's and crosses paths with the duo in an investigation and there we get the backstory. While Ellie's Vampirism from Season 2 was assumed to be cured, one lasting effect is that she hasn't aged a day but has acquired restaurants and a new confident and no nonsen attitude. Jago's found his place as the presenter on a Victorian-themed Variety Show while Litefoot manages a book store specializing in Victoriana.

The problems with the story do come up with its second half as it really gets down to cases by its investigation of Timothy V and the Victorian Values society. First, we have two cheats in the story. First, is the mention of a rock that was picked up on Venus and is magically able to foil the death dealing attack from the villains. While I'm sure the stone was mentioned, giving it such magical properties. And then we have the moment when the villain's plot is defeated and it's utterly disappointing.

Finally, we have a bit of political ventriloquism that is problematic because it undermines the character. Jonathan Morris has Litefoot deliver a withering condemnation of Victorian England and Victorian values and argue against any attempts to bring back any part of Victorian England. The problem with this is that Litefoot's speech makes it impossible to imagine him or Jago (he basically agrees) ever wanting to go back to Victoria. You can't have characters taking that hard line and then willingly go back. Plus, only in one story was any political view or discomfort with Victorian England ever suggested, so its out of character for the two. A less strident response that simply said, "You can't turn back the clock. Our time had its vices and virtues like every other time and you've romanticized it," would have accomplished what Morris wanted without going against who the characters are. Of course, the Victorian Values group is a bit of a straw man, but that 's generally par for the course.

Overall though, the strong beginning and the stylishness of the story is enough to make up for the plot points that went awry and this is a still a decent beginning for Jago and Litefoot's 1960s adventures.
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User Rating:
9
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NR
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Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 12/20/13 3:24 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

What a relief this was after the previous... two series? Wow. For a while, the Jago & Litefoot stories were a delight-- light-hearted, atmospheric, and great fun. Then they bafflingly and unnecessarily started doing the Big Finish equivalent of sending the cast to Hawaii and bringing in 'surprise' guest stars. But while these tactics are usually used as a lifeline for a past-its-prime sitcom, in this case they were the source of all the trouble. Fortunately, this episode jettisons all the unwelcome accretions and gets back to what it was doing right from the start. It isn't without its flaws: the new setting works very well, but could be a dangerous gimmick in the wrong hands, and the story does start to waver as it nears the finish. Praise is also due to the duo's new ally Inspector Sacker, nicely played by Wisbey to strike a welcome balance between skeptical straight man and mischievous foil. His character gets more depth and nuance here than poor Louise Jameson's did in eight episodes!