Stories:
2827
Members:
711
Submitted Reviews:
7681
Reviewers:
328
< 2.5 Animal
3.1 - The Elite >

2.6 Earth Aid

Rating Votes
10
13%
9
9
10%
7
8
16%
11
7
26%
18
6
19%
13
5
9%
6
4
7%
5
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.2
Votes
69
Director:
Writer:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 1/14/16 11:53 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

'Earth Aid' has more of a plot than the last couple of stories, and despite a slow start is more engaging: although, the characters feel very similar and the Metatraxi make another appearance in this series, unfortunately. The Doctor and Ace are in charge of a spaceship and are investigating a ghost ship. Only a sole shell-shocked survivor remaining. How this came about is not explained. This leads to a lot of Star Trek references which don't do anything for me.

At the end of 'Animal' Raine discovers her father's death, forcing her to take some time out; only to reappear in this story. Did she learn anything? No. Was there any character progression? No. So, what was the point? The Metatraxi are portrayed as spoilt children which only further removes any sense of threat from them. There were some good ideas in this but not many. A mixed bag that wasn't really much better or worse than anything else in the second series of Lost Stories.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 12/11/15 11:32 am
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Good comedy will create humor through a character's natural response to a situation such as in the case of the Star Trek episode, "The Troubles with Tribbles." Bad comedy will have a character act unnaturally in an attempt to get cheap laughs.

And that's the reason that I had trouble enjoying this episode. The first two episodes attempted to be humorous by writing Ace as an idiot. These moments fall completely flat. Though, even with a character who would be believably stupid, a lot of these jokes wouldn't have been that funny.

The final two episodes do work a bit better and there are some impressive twists in the final episode, though the end feels a bit cheap. It also features Ingrid Oliver making a pre-Osgood appearance in the Whoniverse. Still, at its worst moments, the story comes off as a very daft Star Trek parody and the story's good moments make the story only passable.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 5/6/15 7:35 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Earth Aid was originally meant to be the three part opener to Season 27 and from what I can gather had only its first part finished with the synopsis of the other two ready. Here it has been moved to the finale and has been written to fill four episodes and to include Raine. Luckily Raine gets to be integrated really well into the story showing up at the cliffhanger to Part One in a role reversal to her introduction with the Doctor breaking her out of a safe. Ben Aaronovitch and Andrew Cartmel must receive props for subtly parodying Star Trek without taking away from telling a good story. The Metatraxi return here and it really helps that they were introduced earlier in Crime of the Century and are really fleshed out as a race. I really hope they make a return along with the Grubs.

The only complaint is that Parts Three and Four have some slight problems with plotting and the crew of Ace's ship take to long to catch on that she isn't a captain. This is definitely the best of the Season 27 Lost Stories.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: Crystal LogicReview Date: 10/7/12 8:13 pm
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Andrew Cartmel really seems to divide fans. This whole quartet of stories seems to have met with some surprisingly negative reaction, and I can't think why. Honestly, this whole setup was a huge breath of fresh air for me, and just about reinvigorated my interest in Big Finish, which I admit had been flagging for a while there. I certainly liked these four a lot better than the previous season of Colin Baker lost stories.

Cartmel can really write character interaction almost better than anyone. Even most incidental characters who only get a few lines seem surprisingly fleshed out. It's really rather eerie that he can do this so easily. His weakness, perhaps, is plot, which he seems to basically make up as he goes along. However, his capptivating writing and the at times brilliant interaction of his characters, whose dialogues always feel 100% realistic and natural (a much rarer thing than you might think), just about make up for his shortcomings.

he's got Ben Aaronovich to help him out on this one, and it shows. The story seems a little tighter, the suspense just a little bit higher, and the space setting seems atypical of a Cartmel solo outing. I loved the fact that Ace can only command a starship by falling back on her vague memories of Star Trek....it's subtle enough that the reference doesn't bother me at all, and instead makes me grin, especially as the rest of the ship crew thinks she's a bit nuts, at best, or downright suspicious at worst.

The suspense and mystery in the first two parts is at a very high level. It's almost a disappointment that the revelations come a bit more quietly and subtly than expected, but not really, as everything is handled with such a level of confidence. It's amazing how different things feel from "normal" Big Finish stories, and thinking about it, it's still hard to put my finger on exactly what contsitutes this difference.

I'm not wild about the ending, with the whole plot basically being predicated on nobody telling anybody else what's really going on. I get that the Doctor seems to be testing Ace, in particular, through all these stories, but she's been really aggravated with him for a lot less, and nobody seems too bothered at the end that the Doctor has basically been playing a game with everybody. It seems that everything was wrapped up too quickly with the mutiny angle, too, and as I rather liked Ace's two subordinates on the ship I wanted their story to somehow have more of a satisfying conclusion. Finally, it could just be that I missed something, but I don't understand Victor and his motivation at all.

Still, the pacing and feel of this story (and the whole arc, in fact) is rather unique and wonderful, I must say. For writers who pioneered the image of the "dark" seventh Doctor, too, this is surprisingly lighthearted and a lot of fun.

These stories deserve a lot more praise. Go and get 'em!