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< 2.1 - Litefoot and Sanders
2.3 - The Theatre of Dreams >

2.2 - The Necropolis Express

Rating Votes
10
8%
7
9
11%
10
8
48%
43
7
20%
18
6
9%
8
5
3%
3
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.8
Votes
89
Jago & Litefoot - Series 2
8.1
Boxset Average Rating
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: JMChurch25Review Date: 10/26/18 4:21 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

"The Necropolis Express" begins on a somewhat ominous note with Jago and Litefoot journeying to follow up on a thread leftover from the previous story. This thread takes them to a mysterious train that's transporting a dear friend to her final resting place in a pauper's graveyard. But as lightning strikes and the ground grows warm, the dead begin to reappear from their graves along with a friend of Litefoot's past with a dark agenda.....'Necropolis' is a stunning continuation for the series and an absolutely horrifying story in its own right. It takes the darkness of the setting and premise behind it and amplifies it to the nth degree in some of the most disturbing soundscape and imagery I've yet heard in an audio. Mark Morris' script is perfectly macabre playing around with an idea of zombies and the undead that has been used before but never in quite such a disturbing way. It takes a lot to make a zombie story interesting for me so major kudos for actually engaging and even freaking me out in places. Some of the screams and monstrous voices we hear are some of the scariest I've heard in recent memory and the fact that we and the two leads have such a personal connection to what's going on only makes it more tense and nail-biting. But the story also never loses it's sense of humor and there are some laugh out loud hilarious moments too that made me snicker. The cast is again fabulous with Benjamin and Baxter once again giving their all. Vernon Dobtcheff as the main villain of the piece takes what could have easily been a caricatured mad scientist role and makes him interestingly psychotic and deeply personal to Litefoot's past with a deep and slimey voice that gives you the utter creeps. There is also the revival of a character last seen dead in the previous story, ties back to the main arc of the story that's aren't surprising but are still chilling, and a conclusion that only continues to ask questions for the future and how things are going to play out for our team from here. I wouldn't say it's quite as streamlined as the last story as several ideas are brought up but dropped rather quickly. I love the idea of the Necropolis Express itself as it's suitably creepy and something that I never really thought about in regards to the time period. But we only hear about it in the first few minutes of the story and then are immediately dropped into the graveyard almost abandoning it entirely. The connection between the villain and Litefoot also feels somewhat extraneous despite the sparkling dialogue it brings between Dobtcheff and Baxter and I wish we had gotten to explore that further or changed things around so that it felt more necessary. Overall though despite some easier to spot flaws and a less focused narrative, I adored 'Necropolis Express' even more so than "Litefoot and Saunders" in places. It managed to make an overused monster interesting again as well as horrify me in the best of ways with its audio horror and storytelling.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: EiphelReview Date: 1/11/11 12:43 am
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

The Necropolis Express is a slight step up from Litefoot and Sanders, with the first two thirds being particularly good, though the climax a little weak.

The beginning is very pleasing with its atmospherics. Jago and Litefoot convene in a station, the Red Tavern no longer a favoured haunt. The joy of their partnership comes out in Litefoot gently teasing Henry. The clandestine train to take corpses from the city is wonderfully flavourful. The duo alone in the countryside at night, beside a railway line and an old crumbling church - This is delicious stuff.

Things are kicked up a notch with the arrival of Rubin Mord, a deliciously gothic character that reminded me of the central figure in The Goblins Who Stole a Sexton. Played just the right side of a characture, with some delicious dialogue, he really gets the plot rolling.

The shift in tone upon entering the church is disappointing only because of the loss of the wonderful nighttime countryside atmosphere, but the deserted lab, whilst something of an old staple, remains rich. The arrival of Crow, like Mord, notches things up again by progressing the plot whilst furnishing us with delicious dialogue. I feel Jago finds himself a little sidelined here - sent trotting off down a corridor whilst Crow and Litefoot banter at length, but it's great banter and Jago tends to get the lion's share in most stories, so it's fair enough.

After this, I felt things fizzled slightly, though still largely entertaining. The story slides away from ghastly horror and into somewhat straightforward mad scientist territory, though I still enjoyed Crow's motives. The resolution comes in slightly predictable form, and I confess the climax felt more noisy than dramatic. The coda is gently, characterful, and pleasing (though a little puzzling - Why Litefoot thinks Jago's glib suggestion just might work is unclear), although I have to admit, I felt it curtailed the opportunity to explore the potential aftermath of Litefoot and Sanders. This, along with feelings on the previous story, and a final scene that I would have expected later in the series, leads me to wonder if this season is just too compressed at four stories. Anyway, on the whole, The Necropolis Express is a worthy 8/10, which may have been even stronger if the whole play had maintained the style of the first half.