Stories:
2827
Members:
711
Submitted Reviews:
7681
Reviewers:
328
< 24. The Eye of the Scorpion
26. Primeval >

25. Colditz

Rating Votes
10
7%
12
9
24%
45
8
35%
65
7
21%
38
6
10%
19
5
2%
4
4
1%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.9
Votes
184
Cover Art:
Director:
Music:
Music:
Sound Design:
Sound Design:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 6/5/17 10:46 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This is a great story. My only complaint, and it's a small one, is that Ace's side of the story gets pretty thoroughly overshadowed by the Doctor/Klein subplot. There's nothing wrong with Ace's subplot, but Klein is such an excellent character that she basically steals the whole story, which unfortunately draws attention from some really interesting stuff happening with Ace.

People tend to focus on her ambivalence over her name, a point that is picked up less effectively in subsequent stories, but that's not what I'm talking about. Ace's side of this story serves as an interesting deconstruction of some standard "Doctor Who" tropes. Ace and the Doctor break out of prison literally all the time, so Ace has a really hard time understanding why Colditz is different. But it is. Ace's story represents a difficult collision between the lazy adventure story tropes that tend to govern Ace's life and the cold, merciless reality of a Nazi prison camp in 1944. Calling attention to the essential implausibility of many of the basic tropes that "Doctor Who" relies on is tricky, and it shouldn't be done too often, but this script handles it perfectly. It comes across not as a criticism of standard "Doctor Who", but rather as a particular interest in historical accuracy which isn't suited to every story, but adds quite a lot to this one. The point is not to criticize "Doctor Who" for contriving implausibly easy escapes from prisons all the time, but rather to make a historically well-informed about the particular real-life prison featured in this story. Notice how Lyons's previous script, "The Fires of Vulcan", used prison in the traditional way: as a plot obstacle to be overcome with ingenuity, resourcefulness, and implausible good fortune. Because that story wasn't *about* a prison.

That's all great, so it's kind of a shame that Klein overshadows it all. But Klein is really great also, and the credit for that must be shared between Lyons and Tracey Childs. The concept of the character is so strong that it's hard to imagine how a poor performance could mess it up, but Childs delivers a fantastic performance that really makes the most of it. She's cold, calculating, and ruthless, but what rally sells her is that she has a clear point-of-view which she believes in absolutely. The story, like "The Fires of Vulcan", is another time-travel puzzle. The Doctor has to learn what he can about Klein's past in order to change his future and prevent her past from ever happening. It's not only a clever story on paper, but it's very compellingly conveyed in the drama as well.

All in all, an excellent story.

Other Recommendations

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 7/9/16 10:54 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This story introduces Klein to the Doctor Who universe and also features David Tennant's first appearance in Doctor Who as the rather nasty Sergeant Kertz as the Doctor and Ace land in the toughest to escape prison camp in Nazi Germany at Colditz Castle.

The plot is superb, and the interactions between the Doctor and Klein over the Doctor's hope to change history back to its original course, and you instanty see why there was a decision to bring her back. There are plenty of clever twists along the way including the reveal of what actually changed history and it's not what you'd expect.

I also liked how well Ace actually fits in in a prison camp filled with POWs who've escaped from other camps, and the nobility of the English officers likable. At the same time, there's a bit nuance provided to the Germans in the form of Shafer. Overall, this is a very engrossing story
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
5
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: drwhatPieter2Review Date: 4/30/16 7:38 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

This is where the Seventh Doctor and Ace meeting Klein for the first time. In the most dangerous prison in Nazi Germany.

The Doctor and Ace landing in a castle, but didt realise where they landed and when they landed. They where captured by nazis and the place they are is Colditz Castle. And they are bullied by a colenell Feldwebel Kurtz who played by a guy so called David Tennant. Whom you known for playing The Tenth Doctor. Who is pretty good to play a villian instead then a hero. Abd then the Doctor meeting a charachter called Elizabeth Klein (Tracey Childs) who wants the Doctors TARDIS to go to her own future where the Germans hae won the war.

And Ace meets british soldiers who are trying to escape the most secured prison in Germany.


A typical Steve Lyons story placed in a tragic and darker periods of history.

Nazis thugs, mysterious time traveler from the future who want Germay to win. Ace Helping Soldiers escape. Good story try to listen. 7/10
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/15/15 5:37 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Written by Steven Lyons and directed by Gary Russell, Colditz was released in October 2001. The Doctor and Ace hit a temporal anomaly in the TARDIS and land in Germany 1944 on the grounds of Colditz castle. They need to wait for the TARDIS to recharge so venture outside and get themselves captured by the guards who think that they are British spies. The Doctor is shot in the shoulder in the process. Ace rebels against the authority of the guards and finds herself at odds with the sadistic Kurtz. The Doctor meanwhile is being coerced by the mysterious Elizabeth Klein who is very familiar with his TARDIS.

This audio drama was recorded on 26 and 27 May 2001 and music sounds dated and the arrangement is unsophisticated and erratic which undermines any atmosphere rather than underpins it. It has a habit of bursting in and suddenly dropping out, while the style bounced around rather unnaturally. Mainly it was composed of snare drums but there were occasionally flutes, triangles and various synths. And often smothered the quieter spoken lines. It was some of the oddest music I have heard in the Big Finish range. The echo effects for the cells sounded unnatural which had a knock on effect with footsteps and other sounds.

McCoy's performance was generally good but his delivery of righteous indignation was way off at times, which is a shame because it was one of the things he did best during his last two seasons. Tracey Childs as Klein was probably the highlight in terms of performances, David Tennant as Kurtz and came close. The characters were generally shallow and trite but functional.

The tone of this audio drama was a bit unsteady to begin with as at the beginning the Doctor was shot, and Ace was asked to strip by the guards suggesting we were in store for something gritty, but the Doctor healed rapidly to the bemusement of the prison doctor and we were later told Ace refused the humiliation of having to strip so none of it really mattered as there were no real consequences to either. When Ace was eventually slapped by Kurtz the music instantly started up with the snare drums and quickly ended with a withering trombone sound once again sabotaging the tone of the piece.

The prisoners want to escape, Klein want to escape back to her reality and the Doctor and Ace want to escape back to the Tardis. This is rather dialogue heavy. The plot revolved around a temporal anomaly resolving itself so it would be tricky to explain and I would end up spoiling it but needless to say it was well written and clever, although initially confusing to keep track off. Good plotting but not the most polished example of Big Finish writing you are likely to hear but enjoyable none the less.