Stories:
2869
Members:
727
Submitted Reviews:
8140
Reviewers:
339
< 2. Excelis Rising

3. Excelis Decays

Rating Votes
10
4%
2
9
5%
3
8
14%
8
7
21%
12
6
26%
15
5
18%
10
4
12%
7
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
6.4
Votes
57
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 6/20/17 11:47 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Coincidentally, I happened to be reading Christopher Bulis's MA "Twilight of the Gods" when I listened to this. Both stories use tropes associated with communism in a superficial way, and neither presents much in the way of intelligible political commentary. In the case of this story, it's really not a problem. All the "Inner Party" stuff is just a convenient shorthand to establish that the Excelis Empire is a tightly controlled totalitarian regime.

The story provides an effective but underwhelming end to the Doctor's adventures on Excelis.Overall, I like the idea of three interconnected stories involving three Doctors visiting three different periods in a planet's history, but this script tries to make more out of it than there is. There's dialogue suggesting that the Doctor's history is somehow tied up with that of Artaris, but frankly, I don't see it. He's just been there a few times... there's no need to make any more of it than that.

Although Anthony Stewart Head plays the same character in all three stories, his performances are quite different. I like that. After all, people do change over the course of a lifetime... especially an unnaturally long lifetime. Of the three personas (personae?), Sutton is my favorite. He's got by far the most personality, and really seems to be enjoying himself.

But the story is unexceptional, and largely forgettable. While it's fun to have Yee Jee Tso back in "Doctor Who", he's not actually very good, and putting him in long scenes acting against either Head or Ian Collier really makes that clear.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
4
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
3
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/20/15 11:43 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor had left Excelis in Excelis Rising with the planet on the verge of the golden age. He returns to find the planet an Orwellian nightmare in perpetual war and the Doctor's old foe has a new identity and is manipulating things to a truly diabolical end.

This is a dark story and depressing with Sylvester McCoy's performance being the saving grace. The Doctor's principles and his belief in liberty are well-portrayed. by McCoy and is perhaps the one bright spot.

After a fairly engaging first third or so, the story really sags under its own weight. The idea of how totalitarian regimes take hold and take power was powerful and the concept of the Elite (i.e. Meat Puppets) was truly terrifying. However, the story drowned in its own verbosity as characters one by one reeled off reams of backstory at each other and the audience. The big problem here seems to be that 70 minutes wasn't enough to tell the story writer Craig Hinton wanted to tell.

Most actual action happened off mike so that we could have everyone explaining everything. We even have a very contrived story where the Doctor is captured by the Wardens and kept in the quarters of the Major whose housekeeper just happened to be sympathetic to the concerns about Excellis, and this Major just happened to have the only set of book in the City State of Excellis. And I can't help but remark on how flat Yee Jee Tso was as the Major. While many characters seemed off due to Hinton's overbearing dialogue but Tso was the worst. Overall, this is a bleak little mess.