Stories:
2552
Members:
750
Submitted Reviews:
6389
Reviewers:
295
< 1. The Bleeding Heart
3. The Other Side >

2. The Window on the Moor

Rating Votes
10
0%
0
9
5%
1
8
21%
4
7
21%
4
6
32%
6
5
5%
1
4
11%
2
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
5%
1
Average Rating
6.3
Votes
19
The Ninth Doctor Chronicles - Series 1
7.1
Boxset Average Rating
Director:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 6/11/17 1:17 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The story features the Ninth Doctor and Rose landing on a planet where a Civil War is being fought between a Duke and the Prince. It's a slow paced story and it has some good moments as well as the interesting concept of interdimensional windows or interplanetary windows not entirely sure, but overall it was a bit bland, particularly the Villain.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 5/17/17 5:45 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

In The Window on the Moor, the second story of the Ninth Doctor Chronicles, Emily Brontë (Laura Riseborough) has been having strange visions of strange soldiers and a glass city, helped by a window to another world. Meanwhile, the Doctor and Rose Tyler arrive in an abandoned glass city in the midst of an unusual civil war. Worlds are about to collide, and the universe may not survive, unless the Doctor and Rose can save everyone and everything, even if they have to make some hard sacrifices. The Window on the Moor, the latest entry into the canon of stories featuring the Doctor meeting a famous historical writer (The Unicorn and the Wasp, The Shakespeare Code, etc.), is an enjoyable romp. Featuring a strong dual performance by Laura Riseborough, and a strong script by Una McCormack, this script stands out compared to the first story. While it gets a little confusing at times, and Briggs' impression of the Ninth Doctor is still jarring, I found myself enjoying this story a lot more.

Laura Riseborough takes on the role of Emily Brontë for this story. Portraying historical figures is always a challenge compared to playing an original character, but Riseborough does an excellent job here, becoming a highlight of this story. Her performance as both Emily Brontë and Ada, the lookalike to Emily Brontë from another dimension, is extremely strong. She's able to portray the fiery passion of Emily in once scene, and is then able to turn on a dime to portray the more sensitive, reserved Ada. It's a strong performance by Riseborough, and one of the highlights of the set. Briggs' work narrating and portraying several bit characters is still strong. It's impressive what the man is able to do, because he's able to give life to each and every character, and makes them sound unique. However, his impression of the Ninth Doctor is still a jarring impression, as every time I hear it, it snaps me out of the story. I've found it a bit difficult to concentrate because of the impression. I really wish Briggs had stuck with trying to capture the feel and do a subtler performance, rather than trying to do a dead-on impression of Eccleston, because the results are just not that good.

The story itself was a strong entry by writer Una McCormack. Featuring a delightfully written historical character, an interesting, if sometimes confusing, plot about alternate dimensions and family feuds. McCormack was able to reign in the confusing and disparate aspects of her script to create something quite interesting, and arguably the best Ninth Doctor story from Big Finish yet. The catalyst of this story, the mist that allowed travel from this glass city dimension to the real world was an extremely interesting concept created by McCormack. I quite liked how it was used, both in the glass city dimension, how it was a means of escape, and a desire for Julius, as well as how it was a place for Emily Brontë to escape from her life, and draw inspiration. It was a fascinating concept, made all the better by the Doctor's refusal to allow the technology to continue existing after Julius, Alexandro, and his men disappear into another dimension. Beyond the strong story, McCormack delivered a dead funny script, filled with little references and, as with Cavan Scott's script, absolutely nailing the charm of the Ninth Doctor. Lines like the Doctor thinking the hulking, brutish solider is fantastic, and Rose's line about not having read Wuthering Heights, but knowing it from the Kate Bush song were fun little lines that really added a certain charm to the script that was missing in the opening story. The script was filled with cheeky little lines like that, and it made for a funny script, for a rather serious story. And while McCormack's script was a bit too ambitious at times, and the constant changes in scene became a bit jarring at times, the overall product was a strong, enjoyable story.

Overall, The Window on the Moor was an extremely enjoyable story. With a strong guest star in Laura Riseborough, a mostly strong performance by Nicholas Briggs (except where it counted with his impression of the Ninth Doctor), and a funny, complicated, and enjoyable script by Una McCormack, this story really stands out, much more so than the opening story. It had a fascinating, complicated sci-fi plot, an enjoyable driving plot with the civil war between uncle and nephew, and a fun appearance by Emily Brontë, this story really had a lot going for it. McCormack was juggling a lot of balls with this story, and she managed to successfully catch them all, and it makes for one of the more enjoyable stories I've heard so far.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: JMChurch25Review Date: 5/10/17 8:29 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Ninth Doctor, at this point travelling with companion Rose Tyler, arrives in the middle of a strange war with noblemen in battle, prisons made of glass, and big cities stalked by mysterious and murderous beasts. With worlds colliding and kerfuffles aplenty, fairy tales come to life and the Doctor and Rose come face to face with Emily Bronte and her wondrous imagination. This is a story full of fanciful storytelling and strong women in everything from the companion to the historical figure and even the author Una McCormack. However to be honest, this is one a bit of a step down from the previous story. I'm not 100% sure if it's the fact that the power struggle and the parties and people involved in it are quite boring or the fact that Emily Bronte is seriously underused in this story even for a historical figure but this one feels a bit fluffier and not quite as strong or as interesting as its predecessor. Once again, its up to the Doctor and Rose to save the day for both worlds in the story and while Briggs playing Nine works very well, Briggs playing Rose? Not so much. Briggs really doesn't do well with Rose's personality and inflections and I only hope he gets better with it in the next two stories because honestly that was a big distraction for this one. While the script and descriptive story itself by McCormack is very well written, the plot itself gets itself lost in some of the details and personalities of the story with alternate dimensions, family infighting, and other such details and I stopped caring about midway through even with a strong performance by Laura Riseborough as Bronte. There are some things I do like about it though that save it from being irredeemable though. I love Briggs portraying the softening Nine and it really shows how much having a companion affects the Ninth Doctor compared to the previous story. The ideas in this one are certainly cool and very suitable for Bronte if that makes sense and it's neat to see Doctor Who try to tackle a concept that wouldn't necessarily be in the cards for a TV budget. It also seems to find a very healthy middle ground between fairy tale fun and realistic bleakness which I really admire for this kind of story as it could easily have skewed too much in either direction. But all in all, this story didn't do much for me personally but I could see how other listeners would really get a lot out of it. This would very much be a good audio for Ninth Doctor fans and new Big Finish listeners to get in to even more so than the previous story. But for me, I was ready to move on to the next story even before it was done despite it's good moments.