Stories:
2273
Members:
697
Submitted Reviews:
5701
Reviewers:
277
< 4. The Land of the Dead
6. The Marian Conspiracy >

5. The Fearmonger

Rating Votes
10
13%
19
9
20%
30
8
24%
36
7
22%
32
6
12%
18
5
3%
4
4
3%
4
3
1%
2
2
1%
2
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.7
Votes
147

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 3/14/17 11:48 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

An exceptionally strong story. Very nearly perfect. It's got a great concept, it's very tightly plotted, and it's simply a joy to listen to. Apparently, the writing process for this story was exceptionally difficult, but you wouldn't think so from listening to it. It sounds almost effortless. The script juggles a lot of plot elements with great deftness. I can't say enough good things about it.

The story is overtly political, which isn't everyone's cup of tea, but it's something I happen to appreciate. Many people say that this story was prescient, and they mean it as a compliment. But after revisiting the story in the wake of Brexit and Trump, and I can't help noticing that there's no positive left-wing alternative offered to the overt racism of Sherilyn Harper. From Stephen Keyser to Walter Jacobs and even Alexsandr Karadjic... none of them seems to have any political opinions at all except opposition to her. If this story is prescient of anything, it's that something will always beat nothing, no matter how vile that something is.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: dtomReview Date: 1/31/17 7:54 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

If you like your Doctor Who dark and brooding, then this might just be the one for you. Writer Jonathon Blum, another graduate from BBC 8th Doctor novels, serves up a tale of politicians using fear and loathing to grasp power, very apt in our post-truth landscape, alongside terrorism and assassinations.

It’s the perfect vehicle for Sylvester McCoy’s enigmatic Doctor and Sophie Aldred’s cynical Ace. The supporting cast are largely excellent and despite the complex plotting the whole thing rattles along at a terrific pace. There is a fair amount of violence depicted in the story which might put some off. The use of guns and bombs occur in several scenes but these are indicative of the plot and not just a sensationalist add on.

For the most part the plot hangs together and I well worth a second listen. The incidental music is unobtrusive and the soundscape works well.
McCoy’s is excellent here. The script plays to his strengths and avoids monologues and overt dramatic. He plays the role here as a both melancholic and enigmatic. He gets some cracking lines and doesn’t waste them. Sophie Aldred backs him up with an equally good
performance as Ace. Here she appears older and wiser, and suggests that time has passed for the characters since their final TV airing. In several instances, it is her who takes the more proactive role, with the Doctor acting as an interested observer.

For fan’s of seventies sci fi will also be delighted that Jacqueline Pearce (Blake 7) is involved. Here she plays an opportunist right wing politician. Her political speeches are very reminiscent of Maggie Thatcher’s delivery and its clear Jacqueline is having a great time doing it. A special mention should be made here for Hugh Walters, another actor sadly no longer with us, whose credits include a 1965 appearance in The Chase alongside the 1st Doctor. Here he plays a spin-doctor with marvelous creepiness.

There is very little to complain about in this production. It was good value and full price and at the bargain basement price of £2.99 it is practically a steal
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 5/28/16 8:17 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Now over the last four Big Finish monthly range reviews I have said how much potential the stories actually had, but how little of that potential is actually used in the stories that were released. Well good news Whovians as Jonathan Blum’s only Big Finish story has the graces of fulfilling almost every idea that it introduces to some extent. This story officially marks the turning point where the releases following became more and more solid with a few stories here and there being clunkers as there is with any output of stories. Blum takes an approach to the story established by the Virgin New Adventures by creating an almost natural progression to the levels of darkness and manipulation that the Doctor does in the story. The plot of this story involves the Doctor and Ace investigating the new Britannia where it is election year and the most prominent candidate Sherilyn Harper, played by Jacqueline Pearce. All isn’t well as the time travelers are chasing a creature that feeds on the fear of others causing people to have acts of terrorism and attempted assassination.



The story is a complete political thriller and it succeeds with this. It basically takes the most interesting aspects of Whispers of Terror and elevates those elements to perfection. Pearce is a brilliant performer as you are never really sure when it is Harper or the creature talking as only Paul Tanner can hear it and he is slowly breaking down. The tension continues to ramp up as the story continues until it climaxes in a warehouse where everything is revealed yet you never get a full explanation about what the creature is and where it came from. That works best for the story as you are given just enough to have the ideas of what the creature is and you know how far it can make people go in obeying it’s hunger for the emotion of fear and chaos.



The acting in the story is top notch with Sylvester McCoy being much better than he was in The Sirens of Time as he doesn’t have to put much effort into being the manipulator. He knows exactly what notes to hit to make the story work and continue to keep you guessing on what the creature is doing. Sophie Aldred returns of course as Ace and her voice acting is probably the best of the returning companions as since her Doctor Who days she has taken numerous voice acting roles for children’s television which can really build up her set of skills. The character of Mick Thompson, played by Sophie Aldred’s husband Vince Henderson, is great at bringing on the social commentary of the story about how warped the media can get. Thompson is a reality radio host who is pretty much a giant troll. The commentary continues to be relevant to this day and the story just improves with age as we have an internet culture where anyone can troll and terror threats are very real. The music of the story also really pops as it sounds very much like music from the 1990s and the sound design really makes some of the dizzying moments of the story pop out.



The real shame of the story is that there are just a few acting hiccups that happen throughout the story. They rarely come up but when they do, they really pop off in a stellar production from Big Finish. Another shame is that Jonathan Blum only wrote this story for Big Finish as there was a lot of production problems with this story and the way Blum was treated wasn’t very good for him so he decided to leave Doctor Who in general after his BBC Books run.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: PolarityReversalReview Date: 1/16/16 12:43 am
0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Seventh Doctor is on point with his classic humor and buffoonery. The sound effects were phenomenal. The main thing that makes this story drive is trying to nail down just who or what the real villain is. Highly recommend.
Log in to submit Rating and Review.

Community