Stories:
2786
Members:
703
Submitted Reviews:
7352
Reviewers:
317
< Timewyrm: Apocalypse
Cat's Cradle: Time's Crucible >

Timewyrm: Revelation

Rating Votes
10
27%
3
9
27%
3
8
18%
2
7
27%
3
6
0%
0
5
0%
0
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.5
Votes
11
Writer:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: BrainofMorbius23Review Date: 12/1/17 11:40 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Magnificent and intelligent ending to a inconsistent quadrilogy that with exodus makes the books worth it.

A must read of the new adventures range
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 8/3/16 7:28 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Off the bat, Revelation does not feel like the preceding three novels - like 'that one Big Finish story', this is the one that finally delivered the promise of going far beyond the remit of the show and using the format to its advantage. This is a story entirely suited to literature, and as such feels like a well worn glove: this is first and foremost a piece of literature, not a hack novelised script. Without spoiling plot elements, Revelation is as surreal (actually moreso) than the bonkers front cover... sentient architecture; mind bending travels; butchery (of characters you really won't expect!) and heavy canon. Whilst throwing in the odd past Doctor and past companions, Revelation teeters on the edge of needless fan-service but never quite reaches the excesses of fan fiction. This is namely due to an expert use of the literary form to explore the Doctor and Ace's psyche, as well as attempting to tackle some ethical qualms unaddressed on the show. Again, spoiler-light, but lets just say RTD's work in Journey's End doesn't appear half as original after a read of Timewyrm 4. Tangentially, bonus points for 'fear makes companions of us all' ripped wholesale and stuck into Listen. I'm convinced this cannot be a coincidence.

My issue with Timewyrm Revelation however is that Paul Cornell is juggling a tonnage of plot twists and characters, occasionally losing focus on the greatest strength of the book, aforementioned mature introspection of Ace and her relationship with the Doctor and her own past. Cornell writes about Hemmings (needlessly brought back from Exodus), 'only a sense of what he wasn't defined him', and by jingo can this be bounced back onto Mr. Cornell. Rather than tackling the juicy character drama, we trundle off towards the latter half of the book to reaffirm a series of political diatribes. We're reminded (relentlessly) that the Nazi's weren't a barrel of laughs; reminded (heavy handedly) that racism inflicts cruel emotional damage and that rape is terrible. It's bizarre to see Mr. Cornell make some heartfelt and really memorably tactful observations on bullying, before untactfully wasting time reaffirming basic morality.

This dichotomy gets even more distinct when cutting from insightful character drama to the fascist world of... Britain in the mid-1980's... Cornell goes on multiple diatribes, alluding to the Thatcher government being of a racist character; generalising and caricaturing working classes on an evening out as well as Freudian slips preaching the glories of the undergraduate, and their romantic isolation from the classes they used to belong to. To say this is a psychoanalysis masquerading as a Doctor Who adventure, Paul Cornell's ticks and opinions, for better and worse, frequent the book and for me personally, interrupted.

Whilst stabbing at some real tactful observations, Revelation goes off on diatribes. Whilst attempting to ground the character drama, characters are rigidly distinct by class: graduate-types (infallible and quirky); working-classes (moronic, racialist, rape-apologisers and anti-intellectuals) and 'the rest' (wacky Douglas Adamsesque talking buildings; nazis; doom-mongering zombies). It's a story where brutal, night-on sadistic child violence takes place mere pages before wacky hyjinx straight from the Key to Time. Where a beautiful exploration of bullying takes place pages before personal diatribes with all the subtlety of a HGV in a China Shop!

It may appear that I've been overly critical - when Revelation hits home it'll have you laughing, skin-crawling and forced to sit back and mull over a poignant point. When Revelations misses it'll have you frustrated, be-muzzled, eye-rolling and uncomfortable. It's a noble experiment that for the most part works, and is a massive leap forward in the VNA's. It's also, as is the point of experiments, a learning experience. In attempting to have its cake and eat it, too many ideas jostle for too little place. Tone shifts jar, shocks may go too far and become needlessly cruel.

It aint' perfect, but its a weird, brave and bold book and well worth your time!
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 5/13/16 10:44 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

After I struggled to remember what happened in the end of Timewyrm: Apocalypse, Paul Cornell’s debut novel, Timewyrm: Revelation, proves to be quite the opposite of Apocalypse living up to expectations set in the other Timewyrm novels. What first strikes the reader is the cover seeing the Doctor dance with Death on the Moon while an astronaut looks on and a church is in the background. An odd image to be sure, but not nearly as surreal as the novel gets. The novel is first and foremost an introspection of the mind of the Doctor and we get to see much of the way that the other Doctors are seen except for the Second Doctor, who got his time to shine in Timewyrm: Apocalpyse, and the Sixth Doctor who I theorize actually scares the Seventh Doctor. The way the Doctor sees his other selves fit perfectly with the First Doctor as the Librarian searching for a daisy, the Third Doctor the owner of a fortress and almost a mistake, and the Fourth Doctor as a ferryman who knows more than he lets on. The most interesting aspect of this is how the Fifth Doctor is seen, as the conscience who has been trapped in the Pit. He is the most integral to the plot as to escape his mind Ace must free the conscience after facing every death the Doctor caused. Each death is given gravity even when Katarina appears as Cornell could easily have made her death desensitized.





The plot itself is also very engaging with the Doctor and Ace arriving in the village of Cheldon Bonniface to confront the Timewyrm for the last time. Before long they are whisked off to the moon along with a sentient church, an aged vicar, a married couple and their child, and a child that in a divergent timeline killed Ace as a child. This is where everything gets surreal as before the exploration of the Doctor’s mind, Ace must overcome her own problems and we get to see a lot of her childhood. We see how she could have become incredibly vapid and not nearly as strong a person as she was. We see her relationship with Manisha, her friend mentioned in Ghost Light who died when her house was firebombed by Neo-Nazis. We see Ace’s mother and some of her other friends last seen in Survival and we also see Ace go to The Curse of Fenric length emotions over the Doctor. While she isn’t completely upset with him, here she is angry for his failed master plan. We get to see Chad Boyle, the astronaut on the cover who nearly killed Ace with a brick as a child.





Chad is a really sympathetic villain as we eventually learn what this timeline’s version did turn out to be. He turned into someone who had an ordinary life unlike this Chad who had been enticed by his “Angel” aka the Timewyrm since a young age. He is every petulant child and even the Timewyrm can’t always put up with him. The other characters are a bit of a negative as the married couple, Peter and Emily Hutchings, are a bit bland. Peter suffers the most as at least Emily is a strong independent woman. They are only there to conclude the plot. The vicar is a bit bland as well, but Saul is extremely interesting. Saul is the sentient church who is pretty much a less depressed and churchier version of Marvin the Paranoid Android from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. The Timewyrm is also brilliantly written here as the intimidating villain and although the ending is a touch of a cop out, she has a great presence.