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< Jago & Litefoot & Strax - The Haunting
11.2 - Maurice >

11.1 - Jago and Son

Rating Votes
10
3%
1
9
3%
1
8
55%
16
7
28%
8
6
10%
3
5
0%
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4
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Average Rating
7.6
Votes
30
Jago & Litefoot - Series 11
7.8
Boxset Average Rating
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 8/17/16 6:12 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A fun romp that introduces us to a potential son of Jago as well as an old friend of Professor Litefoot’s. There’s plenty happening, but this story feels far less self-contained than the previous Jago & Litefoot lead off stories. It really lays out a lot of threads that will be connected through later stories, with a lot of suspense and spookiness around a Satanic cult thrown into the mix.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 5/13/16 12:21 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.



The idea that at some point in his past there has been a dalliance by Henry Jago, is either very endearing or a something that you don’t want to imagine as happened. Either way the progeny of his actions as come back to visit. His son with the eponymous title as his father, so we shall call him Harry, is in a spot of difficulty in the sense that his mother has been taken. It seems that his mother, and Jago’s past lover has a theatrical past, and this has given her and their son a chance to travel. Although mainly out of need not out of choice. They have been pursued by the reminisces of the infamous Hell Fire Club. The Abbot of the group has taken her, but for what purpose. All will be revealed. Coupled with this we also have the introduction of a past acquaintance of Litefoot, in the shape of Jean Braysmore a champion of woman’s rights, in age when it was frowned upon as sort of carved her own niche. Attaining her goals through the deception of the public earlier in her life by cross dressing and becoming a man in order to attain knowledge and status. Jean however is also unwittingly the cause of letting loose on the public of London an array of genetically engineered creatures who are wreaking havoc. Will Jago make up for the lost time with the son he never had, and will Litefoot reveal more about his past relationship with Braysmore. But moreover, Sgt Quick is not himself, like he is having his strings pulled by some other master……
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 5/1/16 8:51 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Barring The Talons of Weng-Chiang, The Mahogany Murderers, and Jago & Litefoot & Strax, I haven't really delved into the lives of Henry Gordon Jago and Professor George Litefoot all too much. Jago & Litefoot, Series 11 is the first time I've truly been immersed in their lives, though not for lack of interest. The box set starts out with a strong showing, with Jago meeting his supposed son, as a religious cult stalks the streets of Victorian London.

Of the few times of listened to Jago & Litefoot stuff, I'm always extremely impressed with how well Christopher Benjamin and Trevor Baxter portray Jago and Litefoot. They seem like they've never left the role from The Talons of Weng-Chiang, and they seem to be having a wonderful time portraying these roles. I think my favorite part is there wonderful back-and-forth; Benjamin and Baxter both play off each other extremely well, and it's wonderful to see.
Rounding out the rest of the main cast of the first part are Lisa Bowerman as Ellie Higson and Inspector Quick as Conrad Asquith (as the website says XD). Both did a fantastic job here; I especially liked the hints to Ellie's true nature throughout the story (one that can put all of them in their place, given half a minute). Asquith was excellent as Inspector Quick, again reprising his role with ease.

As for the guest cast, the main players here are James Joyce as Jago Jr. and Rowena Cooper as Litefoot's archaeologist friend Jean Bazemore. Maybe it's because I'm an archaeologist myself, but I adored Jean Bazemore. She was such a fun character, and I really enjoyed Cooper's portrayal here. Joyce does an okay job her portraying Jago's son. It's a bit of a wooden performance, but it serves the purpose.

The plot of the first story was an interesting story, that I feel is well suited to the era. Satanic cults and mysterious deaths are fun things to listen to in the Victorian era. While I felt the story was a bit busy, I thought that writer Nigel Fairs handled most of the disparate threads fairly well. My only real issue was the conflict between Bazemore and the railway company, over her site. It was an interesting issue that wasn't really solved all that satisfyingly. I wish they'd have done more to maybe reference it later on, but that's not the case.

The starting story of the eleventh Jago & Litefoot box set is a fun little story. The main cast are old hats at their roles by now, and with an interesting story, the box set starts off reasonably well.