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< 209. Aquitaine
211. And You Will Obey Me >

210. The Peterloo Massacre

Rating Votes
10
25%
9
9
28%
10
8
22%
8
7
3%
1
6
6%
2
5
6%
2
4
6%
2
3
0%
0
2
3%
1
1
3%
1
Average Rating
7.9
Votes
36
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Reviewed By: YorickReview Date: 2/12/18 5:55 pm
0 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This story was so achingly moralistic it hurt. With nothing new brought to the age old poor people good, rich people evil cliche.
The cast who played the Hurleys were either stock northerners or, in the case of the mother, some screeching stage school dropout. Avoid.
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User Rating:
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Reviewed By: vorlon64Review Date: 6/24/16 5:00 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

I've never written a review before. I don't have the gift of the gab or conference in writing. However I felt I needed to comment on this story.
I knew nothing of the Peterloo massacre - if fact I thought by the story's name that this was going to be a parody - and I found myself be drawn in and becoming emotionally invested as the story progressed.
The main aspect that hit me with this play is the respect the writer gave the event and that respect seemed to have flowed into the rest of the production.
This is not a fun adventure. It is very much worth the listen however as I feel it's one of Big Finish's finer productions.
There are parts of the story that the reveals you saw coming and the plot is basic however the writing, performance, atmosphere and gravitas of the thing is compelling.

*** Small Spoiler follows ***
One gripe I have is that it did not need to be a 'fixed point in time' event. The set-up and the pacing of the action allowed the possibility that things could have been altered if the Doctor had the foreknowledge of when he was, which could have added another level of tragedy.
The only other gripe is the 'tidying up' and farewells of the characters, in the last few minutes, seemed out of place in tone and attitude.
Two very small gripes.
Now I'm off to research what in fact that reporter did write.
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Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/26/16 7:53 pm
1 out of 3 found this review helpful.

The latest Fifth Doctor trilogy ends with a pure historical episode. In it, the Doctor, Nyssa, and Tegan find themselves on the eve of the Peterloo Massacre, and must find a way to get out unscathed.

I was a little worried about The Peterloo Massacre for two reasons. The first is that it's coming after the excellent Aquitaine and the second is that it's a pure historical. Big Finish tends to be very hit-or-miss with their historical stories. However, I needn't have worried. The Peterloo Massacre is an excellent story, and a great historical episode.

In a different move, Peter Davison actually takes a back seat here, more than the other two stories of this trilogy. He does get some great moments, like his barely contained fury at Mr. Hurley in the final part. But this story focuses on Nyssa and Tegan, making them the main main characters here. Tegan gets some great moments here, acted well by Janet Fielding, but it's really Sarah Sutton as Nyssa who takes the cake. Throughout the story, both have an anger at the conditions of Mr. Hurley's factory and the treatment of the commoners, but it's really the lashing that Nyssa gives at the end that showcases just how good Sutton is. There's a righteous fury in her voice; she's seen a lot of violence and genocide and massacres throughout her life; here, her anger at that comes bubbling to the surface. It's an excellent performance, and a nice change in pace for the character.

The story is a standard "it's a fixed point in time" story, but as I said above, it greatly benefits from the extra emotion that Nyssa and Tegan bring to the story. They did a really good job building up the soundscape; the factory has that clamorous sound and the city sounds like it's bustling with visitors in for a protest. And while the ending felt a bit rushed and unsatisfying, especially as none of the militia truly had anything bad happen, it doesn't detract too much from the story. While I'm on it, I have a feeling that Mr. Hurley, not his son William, was the father of Peter. I feel it fits a bit better with his reaction to Cathy's death.

Overall, I feel that this trilogy was one of the strongest ones the Fifth Doctor has had in a while. The ending really drives it home, with a solid historical, elevated by an emotional performance by Sarah Sutton. The few small quibbles I have with the story don't outweigh the positives of this excellent story.
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Reviewed By: NumaticinReview Date: 4/3/16 3:33 am
0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Coming off the back of Aquitaine, The Peterloo Massacre really doesn't quite make it. As a story, it's fairly barebones, Doctor and co arrives in the past and gets caught up in famous historical event, contemplate how time must run it's course while horrible things go down. It's fairly expected of historical episodes, and while the characters and setting do their best to set this episode apart from others, it just isn't enough.

There are some pretty heavy ideas in however, especially that one particular even which I won't spoil, but sometimes, they do feel a little hamhanded and don't quite get the response they seemed to have been going for. The event in question was built up to the point that the response I had was "Well, obviously." rather than "Oh my god!".

All in all, it's fairly standard, about what you would expect from a Big Finish historical (Think the Perimem historicals for better comparison), they do enough to keep you interested at the time, but I highly doubt you'll feel the need to relisten.