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Purity

Rating Votes
10
38%
26
9
32%
22
8
21%
14
7
4%
3
6
3%
2
5
1%
1
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.9
Votes
68

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 10/23/17 1:43 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The second installment of the "I, Davros" mini-series is a bit of a step down from "Innocence", but not much. It doesn't quite have the same spark that the previous episode had, and there are a couple of questionable plot points.

It focuses on a largely stand-alone episode in young Davros's life, when he is sent on a mission to investigate a new Thal super-weapon. On the one hand, that's a bit corny, but it's hard to be too critical when it is also entirely in keeping with "Genesis of the Daleks". But after the more thoughtful, sophisticated approach of "Innocence", it's a little jarring to be thrust back into "Boys' Own" territory. It's also a bit of coincidence that Davros just happens to stumble across the ancient city Yarvell mentioned, to say nothing of the unlikely re-appearance of Magrantine.

However, if we take this episode purely on its own terms, and don't worry so much about the bigger picture of Davros's developing backstory, this is a very solid episode indeed. It's a crisp, clear wartime adventure story very effectively told. It's mostly quite straightforward, but the pacing is good, plenty of tension, and one or two solid twists to keep it all fresh and interesting. If this was a single episode in an ongoing series of Young Davros Adventures, I'd probably rate it even a bit higher.

I particularly like the stuff about the peace movement, which has been developed from the previous episode. First of all, I like that there is a peace movement. That alone gives the Kaleds a bit more depth than they had on television. Second of all, I like that the peace movement is motivated entirely by survival. Yarvell is not some hippy preaching universal love and brotherhood. She believes that ending the war is the only way for Kaled civilization to survive. Of course, we happen to know that she's right.

Other Recommendations

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 9/29/15 7:48 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

'Purity' has Davros and his sister both in careers they aren't entirely happy with their respective careers. His mother has taken to extravagant spending in order to fill her days and assuage her conscience. Terry Molloy does a fantastic job of personifying the able bodied and unscared Davros.

Davros is sent on a suicide mission, in nightmarish wastelands, and soon finds himself taking command proving himself to be strong willed and fearless. This is the most seminal episode for young Davros. He witnesses survival through hatred and defeat through a lack of will power. Andrew Wisher who plays ‘Reston’ is the son of Michael Wisher, who played Davros in 'Genesis of the Daleks'.

Other Recommendations

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: nowwearealltomReview Date: 6/17/12 2:36 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

(Cross-posted from my blog at finishbig.tumblr.com)

After all the stage-setting in the first part, Purity introduces us to Terry Molloy?s fully-grown Davros. Molloy does a fantastic job bringing the character to life, making him sound like a ?human? while still being identifiably Davros.

One of the interesting things about Davros is just how thoughtful he is. There?s a scene in Genesis of the Daleks that shows this very well, as the Doctor and Davros pause to have a discussion about a virus that would destroy all life in the universe, and whether he would unleash it if he could. There are similar scenes here, where characters act in ways that seem incomprehensible to Davros and he tries desperately to understand.

In one of those conversations, we see Davros begin to realize the power that hatred can have as a motivator and a sustainer, and we begin to see the ideology of the Daleks take shape in him. But there?s still a long way to go between Davros here and Davros in Genesis of the Daleks, and I?m eager to see how that plays out.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: EiphelReview Date: 8/19/10 4:36 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

My absolute favourite from the series. In sharp reversal of Innocence, this one has the strongest plot focus of the series. I love the feel of it - It really does feel like a long, troubled voyage for Davros and Reston, comparable to something like Fellowship of the Rings.

And this is perhaps the most interesting slice of Davros' life. He's picked up some social graces and better conduct since he was a child, and has yet to become the traumatised and crazed individual he will later be. For sure he's still a rather disturbing figure, but he's actually somewhat likable with it, and has something like a genuine friendship with Reston.

Another, even stronger, 9/10.