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< 1.3 - The Bounty of Ceres
2.1 - The Yes Men >

1.4 - An Ordinary Life

Rating Votes
10
8%
4
9
27%
13
8
38%
18
7
13%
6
6
10%
5
5
2%
1
4
2%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.0
Votes
48
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: joehurl89Review Date: 6/15/16 3:25 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

1st Doctor, Sara Kingdom & Stephen
I loved it, racism was rampart everywhere in the 50's, and this catches it greatly, with an invasion of the body snatchers plotline, and baddies who didn't know they were baddies, the plot gets a 10, audio only a 6 sadly, acting could have been better, Jean sounded really old in this one, I know she is getting on, but it is what it is. only a 7, replay is a 10 cause I loved the story.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/22/16 3:14 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor, Steven, and Sara take refuge in the apartment of Jamaican immigrants to the UK in 1950s London. When the Doctor and the TARDIS disappear, Sara and Steven set out to make a new life for themselves with the help of their friends.

The story has a very authentic feel to it, helped by a great guest cast, most notably Ram John Holder as Joseph Roberts. The story shows the plight and prejudice that many new arrivals had to face in 1950s England, but it does in a way that feels natural as opposed to being overly preachy and pushy. It's a great balance.

An Ordinary Life also allows for some nice character development for Steven and Sara as we get to see them in a more domestic situation. Sara's character is fleshed out pretty well as she considers the loss of ability to have children that her military career required.

The Science fiction/alien monster of the week is servicable and a little bit scary. However, it mainly works for how it furthers the character plots and not so much for how intimidating the aliens themselves are. Overall, a very enjoyable listen.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 11/29/15 2:35 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Interesting story, exceptionally well written, and highly enjoyable to boot. The premises of the story is something that we do not get a great deal of drama about, which is a shame, as it retells the past history of the United Kingdom and it's imperialistic impressions that it made on the world. This story tells of those commonwealth residents who came to the "mother" country for various reasons from the Caribbean, in the late 40's but mainly the 1950's. Often referred to as the "Windrush" immigrants. A time when people could seek their fortune and change their lives for the better by coming heart of the Empire. So you may ask how the hell could you work a first Doctor story into all of that. Well Matt Fitton has done just that and produced a cracking story, expertly furnished with a real high quality cast, which includes Peter Purvis as Steven, Jean Marsh as Sara Kingdom, a somewhat under valued, almost Boba Fett style companion/character in the Who universe. Supported ably by Ram John Holder and Sara Powell, Damian Lynch and Stephen Critchlow.

The Dr and the companions have to perform an emergency landing, and Earth 1950's London plays hosts. They find themselves in need of getting the Doctor some assistance and in doing so befriend a local Afro Caribbean family, but they have issues of their own, and when the Doctor disappears along with the Tardis it leaves Stephen and Sara to fend for themselves, and also work out what is going on with their new friends as well as to determine if it's something to do with the non present Doctor.