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< 6.4 - The Trial of George Litefoot
7.2 The Night of 1000 Stars >

7.1 The Monstrous Menagerie

Rating Votes
10
8%
3
9
18%
7
8
51%
20
7
21%
8
6
3%
1
5
0%
0
4
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Average Rating
8.1
Votes
39
Jago & Litefoot - Series 7
8.0
Boxset Average Rating
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/5/15 6:42 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

One thing that never ceases to amaze me is the disparate elements that can be blended into a 'Jago and Litefoot' story, without messing it up. Since the titular pair were brought back, an insightful decision, we have been spoiled with wonderfully creative; detailed stories and inspired performances from the two lead actors. This time around we are treated to Arthur Conan Doyle, illuminous hounds and dinosaurs; we are even teased with a possible reappearance of the Doctor. Although, I do wish they would use the Doctor more sparingly. Even so, we have had Vampires, Werewolves, Sea Zombies, Robots, an excursion to the 1950s and now Dinosaurs!

I can't say that this is the strongest 'Jago & Litefoot' story I have ever heard, but thankfully it's not the worst either, although it's still a weak season opener in my opinion. Now forced to be acting outside of the law, this episode sees the earnest investigators posing as Sherlock Holmes and Watson at the request of Conan Doyle himself. The Portrayal of Conan Doyle as a victim of his own success and perennially perturbed by the lack of interest in his literary works that are free of his two most renowned creations is delightful. I don't know why but I just love it when 'Jago & Litefoot' meet renowned characters, such as Oscar Wilde in a previous series, and drive them to exasperation. After having accepted the invitation our heroes set off on an adventure that lacks the usual humour, and has a timey-wimey resolution. This certainly isn't up to the high standards of Jonathan Morris' previous season opener, The Skeleton Quay. Maybe this one would reward a second listen.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 10/4/15 12:32 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

A great lead off story finds Jago and Litefoot on the run and in disguise as Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson and sent out on a case by none other than Arthur Conan Doyle himself.

Doyle is in the period after he's killed off Holmes in the Final Problem and encountering constant cries from fans to bring Holmes back. Steven Miller does a great job in the story and Jonathan Morris does a great job playing up Doyle's frustration.

There are some great hints and references to future Doyle stories including, "The Hound of the Baskervilles" and "The Lost World." This is a very delightful, well-acted tale and the strongest opening to a Jago and Litefoot box set since Series 1.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 7/18/14 2:37 pm
3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

You would be forgiven to think there is a tinge of plagiarism in this episode, and to all in tense and purposes there is, the two now running from the law as a warrant is out for Jago and Litefoots arrest, they are added and abetted by their friends Ellie and Sgt. Quick, in doing so become assistants to Sir Arthur Conan and Doyle himself. Sir Arthur is fending off his fans one of whom as written a letter, explaining the desperate need for the help of his fictional creations Sherlock Holmes. Needless to say Jago and Litefoot step in. Taking on the roles of Sherlock and Watson, only to be drawn into a story which involves a time machine, and the founding reason why the Hound of The Baskerville's was written. This is a full on Jago and Litefoot adventure which is quite pacey, I do feel that there is a cross over with an old Dr Who stories. Of course the obvious parallel with Jules Verne also crosses my mind when the all the characters are suddenly thrown into a Dinosaur infested parallael time universe. This is a fantastc episode and really well worth the listen. It provides a quality adventure at every turn. Also I find with Jago and Litefoot you can re visit them and not loose any of the fun second, or third, foruth listen.

Highly recommended and a sterling start to Series 7 of Jago and Litefoot.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 4/22/14 11:34 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

I feel like we get two stories here.

One is the tale of a mysterious creature leaving a trail of bodies. Quick needs it investigated and J&L are the men to do it. There is quite a surpising cause to the creature, but it is the type of thing that J&L are qualified to resolve. I found this plot line to be quite strong and entertaining.

The other storyline deal with J&L crossing paths with Arthur Conan Doyle and allowing the author to move on with his career. It is very much a tale of one man's dreams and destiny. As far as Conan Doyle is concerned, Holmes died at the Reichenback Falls and yet his fans want him to keep writing. In the meantime he is working on other less popular projects unaware of what he is destined to be famous for. This story forms a turning point for the author as he finds the inspiration to write what history tells us he will write. This plot line was entertaining as well, but a little forced and perhaps weighted down by the destiny of the character.

Together, the two plots form an uncomfortable, yet complete tale that does little more than warm the listener up for the rest of the series.