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< 101. Absolution
102b. Mission of the Viyrans >

102. The Mind's Eye

Rating Votes
10
7%
6
9
8%
7
8
22%
20
7
32%
29
6
21%
19
5
10%
9
4
2%
2
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.1
Votes
92
The Mind's Eye/Mission of the Viyrans
7.0
Boxset Average Rating
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
NR
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Reviewed By: HexagoraDalekReview Date: 9/11/18 1:11 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This was an overall enjoyable story, with an exciting new world for the TARDIS team. Peter Davison shines as the fifth doctor in particular, his opening lines are some of the best. The cliffhangers in this story are also particularly enticing. It was a good idea to make this a three parter, rather than a four parter, as it seemed quite the right length.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/11/18 5:31 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor is separated from Erimem and Peri and discovers that the planet they've arrived on is infested with plants that can draw them into a dream state and will use that to kill them. At the same time, there's a military expedition present to study the plants and the Doctor is dubious of their motives.

Overall, the story works. The script has some clever conceits that work nicely. The dream states reveal a bit about each of the two companions and their motivations and dreams. Overall, this is a well-done story that really works as a three-parter.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 11/30/17 8:18 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

There's a lot in this story that's a little hard to swallow. The idea of plants causing people to fall into lucid dreams isn't so bad, but the idea of someone else being able to enter those dreams is a little ropey. But only a little. It gets a little worse when you realize the Doctor is having a conversation within Erimem's dream outside of Erimem's presence or awareness. That's a serious problem. The dreams make sense when they're told from the point of view of the dreamer. The Doctor's scene with Kharto breaks the premise.

Still, plausibility isn't necessarily all that important when it comes to "Doctor Who" stories. Problems like this only bother me a little bit. The bigger problem is that, with so much time given over to telling these isolated dream-stories in a three-part adventure, there's very little room for telling the story about the scientific/military expedition's nefarious plans to exploit the plants. In the CD Extras, there's a lot of discussion about how they just couldn't get four-episode worth of story out of the premise, but the non-dream portions of the story are so rushed that I feel like a little more space could only have helped.

The dreams themselves are interesting mostly for what they tell us, by implication, about Peri and Erimem. Although, given the premise (the the dreams are designed to pacify people long enough for the plants to consume them), I'm surprised the dreams are so filled with conflict and struggle. I would have expected them to be more pleasantly seductive. Of course, filling them with drama and conflict make them more entertaining to listen to.

So the dreams are reasonably entertaining, and the three-episode format means that the story never wears out its welcome. But it doesn't amount to much, and the whole thing ends up being rather forgettable.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 1/20/16 1:50 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Mind's Eye is a three-part story by Doctor Who Novelist Colin Brake dealing with lucid dreaming and evil parasitic plants on a planet in the far future. This allows Nicola Bryant and Caroline Morris be put into odd situations cobbled together by their pasts and their different emotions. Both scenarios are extremely interesting in the way that they are set up and they develop. They both take the character to new levels and give motivation for Erimem to leave the TARDIS when she gets a better offer.

Peter Davison's Doctor is also quite good in this story especially when he breaks into his companions' dreams to get them out before you die. He makes their ideal worlds come crashing down around them which is almost heartbreaking. There is a problem with this as Brake doesn't use the lucid dreaming as a twist for a cliffhanger and tries to make them deadly, but that doesn't really create any tension as we know that they can't die in reality if they die in the dream as it works around death to make it an accident that is survived. The story also suffers mainly from some really slow pacing even for a three part story.