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< 93. Renaissance of the Daleks
94b. Urgent Calls >

94a. I.D.

Rating Votes
10
2%
2
9
5%
4
8
19%
16
7
29%
24
6
29%
24
5
8%
7
4
7%
6
3
0%
0
2
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1
1%
1
Average Rating
6.6
Votes
84
I.D. / Urgent Calls
6.6
7.7
Boxset Average Rating
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 1/4/18 5:36 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Doctor arrives on a planet where a research team is hard at work trying to uncover some lost data, but seemingly out of nowhere, their robots (known as Scandroids) begin killing people.

What makes this story strong is its exploration of some amazing ideas centering around using technology to re-engineer the human mind. It never gets bogged down in details, so it rises above many other high concept Doctor Who stories. The three-part format works beautifully for this story, leading to good pacing. When combined with some solid guest actors, and a strong performance from Colin Baker as the Companionless Sixth Doctor, this one is definitely well worth the listen.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 11/12/17 2:13 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I am a very big fan of the three-part format. I gather I'm in the minority, as it didn't last very long, but I think three episodes is just about the perfect length and structure for most standard "Doctor Who" stories, and "I.D." is a perfect example. This isn't a great story. It's not one of the classics. But it's a very good story, and it's just the right length. It would have worked nearly as well as a four-parter, but there's just enough story for a tight three episodes, and that's what we get.

The story develops very nicely over three parts. In addition to introducing the setting, characters, and some important backstory, the first episode focuses on the idea of information-gathering robots called "scandroids" killing people via the transmission of tainted data. That's a great hook, and the script rides it until it starts to run out of steam before moving on to the next major plot point. Then the process is repeated, dividing the narrative into three concise, distinct segments, roughly corresponding to the episodes.

I really don't understand why people are so down on this story. It does get overshadowed a bit by "Urgent Calls", but "I.D." is a fine atory in its own right.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 2/15/16 3:13 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

'I.D.', written by Eddie Robinson and directed by Gary Russell, is about data theft and personality surgery. The music has a light touch, and the atmosphere is generated more naturally by sound effects. The companionless, Doctor lands in the 32nd century and is soon taken prisoner. It's full of good performances, and even though, the plot and characters aren't anything much above average, I do find the idea of personality surgery an appealing concept. People trying to cure internal problems with external solutions is age old but being able to affect changes directly is the kind of concept that Science Fiction is all about. Something that is currently out of our reach and throws up numerous ethical problems. Real food for thought and encourages you to put yourself in the place of the characters. Will the Doctors of the future recommend removing personality aspects like ingrown toenails? Should criminals be forced to get corrective surgery? How would someone consent if they weren't of sound mind?

This story is short and sweet. I think there could be a bit more atmosphere, slightly better characters and slight improvements in other areas, but this really is quite good as it is. The hour and a quarter length and relatively undemanding story makes this a convenient listen for traveling purposes or multi-tasking. Unlikely to be anyone's favourite but there are worse ways to while away an hour or so. 8
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 12/9/14 7:04 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Great concept and good solid performances all round from Colin and cast, and what a massive surprise for me, as Gyles Brandreath better known for being the posh git on TV, as a TV presenter puts in a good shift here, and, actually comes across as one of the better performers. However this is a small cast and as such there is little that can actually go wrong. I love the concept that computers and computer data can actually kill you, what a brilliant idea. Especially for me as I work within the IT field. I love the fact even better that someone with born with a mental/physical aberration that we know of as ADD cannot be wired into the network. This is a wonderful drama, and, Colin comes over as the more of the bumbling know it all Doctor, which suits this down to the ground. With Sara Griffiths supporting in the main this is a well rounded release.

Quick synopsis of the story, an ultimately corrupt set of of individuals driven by money/greed are basically mining data, from every conceivable source. To what end, well part of this is personality surgery, a little tweak here or there so you can get rid of the nagging idiosyncrasy element of ones ID. Then these guys are the surgeons who can help. There is only one problem, someone, as been, tinkering a little too much, and, it all goes horribly wrong.

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