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Logopolis

Rating Votes
10
6%
6
9
16%
15
8
23%
22
7
31%
30
6
16%
15
5
7%
7
4
0%
0
3
1%
1
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.4
Votes
96

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
3
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
4
Effects Rating:
2
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: XxDachshundxX Review Date: 9/23/18 3:06 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Logopolis to me is kind of a mess. I don’t know why it is regarded as being one of the best regeneration stories. In my opinion, it’s one of the weakest from the classic series.
A regeneration story to me is supposed to be two things: a threat that the Doctor can’t survive and a celebration of the era. The stakes are supposed to be set very high, so high that the Doctor has to die.
In this story, well, the stakes are certainly set high. Too high, to be honest. Let’s look at the stakes of previous regeneration stories: in The Tenth Planet - the fate of Earth, in The War Games - the fate of the galaxy, in Planet of the Spiders - the fate of Earth. And then in Logopolis - the fate of everything. Ok then, well that threat sounds epic! The only problem is, we don’t actually see that threat. Sure, we see the cobwebs and styrofoam on Logopolis, and we see some cloudy vortexes from the TARDIS scanner. But to be honest, we don’t see the threat, and that makes it seem unrealistic that the Doctor sacrifices himself to stop it.
Is it a celebration of the era though? Planet of the Spiders is the perfect example of a celebratory regeneration. Several story arcs are resolved, such as Jo Grant’s crystal, Mike Yates’ betrayal and Metabelis 3. It is partially an Earth-bound story and partially a space story. It features monsters from our world that have been made scary. It is, in truth, a celebration of the Jon Pertwee years. But Logopolis celebrated nothing. It ties up no stories arc besides the origin of the CVEs, but that isn’t really a story arc in itself. It may have those flashbacks on monsters and companions, but that doesn’t make it a celebration.
I have a few other problems with the story:
1. Part One is extraordinarily tedious and literally nothing happens besides the Doctor and Adric walking through an infinite number of TARDISs and Tegan and her aunt patching a tyre. All that takes 25 minutes to get through.
2. The technobabble in this story is unbearable. CVEs, recursions, block transfer, Thermodynamics, random nonsense. Worst thing is that us as the audience are treated like we are supposed to know all this!
3. Tom Baker’s Doctor, who used to be funny and smiley, turns here and becomes arrogant and rude to everyone. I know that he’s changed a lot through his era, but you don’t want to ruin his regeneration story by making him extremely unlikable!
4. Logopolis just looks so tatty and boring. The production team had the chance to do something real cool here, but they didn’t. I also don’t understand why a replica of the Pharos Project is on Logopolis. If this is explained, it wasn’t made clear enough because I rewatched this recently and I’m sure it never comes up.
5. The Master’s plan to blackmail the universe is just so bad. All through a radio telescope? Come on Bidmead!
All that aside, I love the concept of the Watcher and the regeneration itself is superb. On the whole, its not a great story, but it has some nice concepts.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: DalekbusterScreen5ReviewsReview Date: 4/8/17 11:34 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

It must have been a sad time for Whovians alive in 1981. The most popular Doctor of that time Tom Baker was about to leave the show he had been the lead for seven years. It would perhaps have looked unlikely anybody would even be able to be twice as good as him. So how do you write out the most popular Doctor?

With a pretty average story it seems. The fourth Doctor's regeneration story sees the Doctor and companions arrive on Logopolis: a planet of mathematicians (yep, they're as boring as they sound) who have the ability of block transfer computations (using calculations to create physical forms). The Doctor wants the people of Logopolis to use this to repair the TARDIS. The Master (Anthony Ainley) arrives and stops the calculations via a counterwave, accidentally causing the end of the universe. It's nothing really special for a regeneration story, certainly not for a fan favourite Doctor. They try to make it sound more exciting by involving the end of the universe but aside from Logopolis collapsing, you don't really see a lot of universal destruction. Logopolis and the mathematicians are a boring concept and really shouldn't have been an idea that made it to the show.

Logopolis is also a story that appears to be more about introducing the new TARDIS crew rather than waving a final goodbye to a hugely successful Doctor. Within the first episode Tegan Jovanka (Janet Fielding) has already accidentally found herself in the TARDIS. The Master himself is Nyssa's father. There's even the whole Watcher element that's hinted to be the next Doctor in some form. This would probably have been more acceptable as Peter Davison's story than as Tom Baker's last. It feels too forward-looking, when really a regeneration story should be a celebration of that Doctor's time in the TARDIS before getting a first glimpse at the newcomer.

On the positive side, Tom Baker's regeneration scene is great. He falls from a radio telescope to stop the Master's new plan to restart the universe's collapse after the Doctor and the Master worked together to stop it. It's a fittingly noble sacrifice on behalf of the universe for such a beloved Doctor and still holds as one of the best regeneration sequences the show has seen. Plus it features the classic line 'It's the end...but the moment has been prepared for' which perfectly explains the process of regeneration. As the series five trailer for the new series of Doctor Who stated, 'The end is just the beginning'.

Tom Baker is on top form too (if not at his very best) and new companion Tegan Jovanka is made a likeable if a little gobby presence by Janet Fielding. I wasn't entirely convinced by Sarah Sutton as Nyssa; a lot of the time she feels like she's just there rather than contributing much beyond the fact that the Master is now using the body of her father. As for Matthew Waterhouse as Adric, he isn't the most compelling character in Logopolis but at least being the holder of a badge of mathematical excellence he has a strong connection to the main plot. Anthony Ainley outshines all of them bar Tom Baker though; his incarnation of the Master was none so brilliant than here, especially when teaming up with the Doctor and subsequently betraying him.

Overall, Logopolis is a bit of an average regeneration story; surprisingly so for the most popular classic series Doctor. Tom Baker deserved better than this. At least he got one of the best regeneration sequences though and new companion Tegan Jovanka is likeable enough. It's just a shame they didn't keep back the introduction of the new companion to Peter Davison's first episode in the role rather than have it take the spotlight away from Tom Baker.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 9/15/16 8:00 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

A real shame, and disappointing regeneration story, but not one particularly poor or strong - just lying tepidly in the middle.

There's some good stuff certainly: the reintroduction of Nyssa brings about a superb dynamic between both her, and her father. Dramatic weight unusual for Who, in my view not since the earlier dynamics of the Hartnell era. Further continuity is brought about through the logical conclusion of the entropy theme - the metafictional nature of Logopolis, the end of an era. Fictionally, Logopolis serves as the keystone of the universe, mathematically postponing a Universal decay by preventing the long overdue second law of thermodynamics - this is accomplished by 'opening the system' through CVE's, some great payoff for the E-Space trilogy and adding some real gravitas to the finale. The gravitas is helped along by the stellar score, and haunting Watcher - namely the earlier scenes of Thameside gazes and Cloister Bells. Eerie and effective.

Unfortunately the second law of thermodynmaics just doesn't make for an exciting or dynamic (pun intended) yarn. The mathematical framework on which the whole serial relies is just utterly dull and tedious, purposefully! Hence all guest cast are tedious and forgettable and the set design accentuates the dull, grey nature of the piece. Bland direction and bland washed out beige. The SFX in general is really poor, and particularly laughable at the climax - unbelievable considering its the dramatic oompf behind the regeneration of Tom Baker! To have Tom's regenerative sacrifice downplayed by effects sub-par in serials years prior, is awful.

Another awful element, or rather two, must be Tegan and Adric. Shrill and annoying, reactive and unphased by alien worlds, after the Time Warrior almost ONE DECADE earlier, its just poor script writing. Adric meanwhile is unrecognisable as maths genius and only musters sympathy for putting up with the Doctors cruel jibes and aloof nature. Metafiction-wise sure it's interesting, after Romana, sure the Doctor ought to be irascible - but ultimately Tom's bowing out serial has no Tom Baker charm, the only laugh coming from a joke at the expense of Tegan's miniaturised Auntie (Seen a little of her)!

By contrast Planet of Spiders through character arc (Yates), support (Brig), homage (gadget race) and checklist of beloved traits (authoritative, charming, moralistic) managed to send off Pertwee with a fitting, albeit slow, serial. Logopolis is simply an even slower plodder (despite losing two episodes!) with no Tom Baker charm.

The regeneration itself suitably plays to fan service, and tear jerked after a marathon of 4th Doctor stories, but objectively even the effects around the stock footage was terrible.

I sat reflecting on the flashback footage reminiscent of adventures past and companions prior - but most strongly for Terror of the Zygons, Leela, Davros, Sarah, Tom's grins, pithy jokes, brooding pretence and silly outbursts. To be the ghost at the feast - I was reminiscent mostly for Hinchcliffe & Holmes. Logopolis' ultimate failure isn't its slow plodding nature or even iffy effects, it's that one the credits hit, to be brutally honest, I was glad to see the end of the Fourth Doctor and some fresh zest back into the show.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/11/15 10:51 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Logopolis is almost equal parts good and bad. The Fourth Doctor gets a fitting regeneration and Tom Baker turns in one of his best moments in the season. Anthony Ainsley returns to menace in an over-the-top way. Sarah Sutton has one of the few great character moments of the story in Episode 4. The concept of math holding the universe together is a little silly and a little awesome at the same time, exactly what you'd expect from Doctor Who.

On the other hand, Tegan was insufferable in her introductory episode and made Adric look good, just because he wasn't Tegan. The pacing could be slow and was incredibly dull in Episode 1 though the pace would pick up considerably once they got to Logopolis. The technobabble could be overwhelming and hard to follow at times. Moreover, even as the characters increased, there were few genuinely good moments except perhaps between the Doctor and Master. And the Doctor's regeneration was handled beautifully with the presence of the Watcher throughout the episode.