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< 4.1 - Jago in Love
4.3 - The Lonely Clock >

4.2 - Beautiful Things

Rating Votes
10
20%
10
9
24%
12
8
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10
7
16%
8
6
10%
5
5
6%
3
4
6%
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Average Rating
7.9
Votes
51

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/13/15 6:20 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Beautiful Things has Professor Dark admitting to being behind the disastrous trip to Brighton but offering to make amends by giving Jago and Litefoot tickets to see Ocsar Wilde. Litefoot skips the play due to some bad blood between him and Wilde and decides to go to the morgue for something to do and finds himself in a case of comatose young men being discovered about London.

Of course, the two are connected and we're introduced to a creepy young man and a dastardly library, which turns into an amazing concept, almost to amazing for one hour long audio. They do a great job painting the enormity of it.

John Dorney does a great job at capturing Oscar Wilde. I loved his interchange with Jago when Wilde teased Jago's verbosity. Wilde also shines in the when confronting the villain. In some ways the story was reminiscent of the Fourth Doctor Audio the Renaissance Man with a similar villain and goal.

The story is one that parents will want to listen to with younger viewers as there are some adult themes. However, these are dealt with tastefully for the most part, though the story does have a definite political message to it, so again viewer discretion advised.

Overall, though, this is another strong story in Series 4.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: chrisscorkscrewReview Date: 4/19/14 1:38 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Beautiful Things is the standout story of Series 4 of Jago and Litefoot. It is well written and fun with a real originality sparkling through that is perhaps absent in some of the other stories of the season, and I thoroughly enjoyed the portrayal of Wilde which was a great contrast to the straightforwardness of Leela.

The slight ambiguity to something Professor Litefoot says towards the end of the story was also intriguing and I couldn't help but wonder if we were privileged enough to see a little more of his inner self than hitherto.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: SkyTwoReview Date: 11/5/13 9:28 pm
1 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Ugh. Not only is the story unfocused and meandering, but it's almost never a good idea to try and recreate legendary personalities in fiction-- generally a terrible, terrible idea unless you're a wonderful, wonderful writer. In this case, Wilde just comes across as smarmy and petulant, which wouldn't be a problem if the point was to present this as a deliberately deconstructionist take. But the author genuinely seems to be attempting to portray him as world-weary, charismatic, and preternaturally witty. The result is some extended banter that isn't much more than a glorified "Who's on first" routine. There's also a continuation of the regrettable trend toward using Leela's thickheaded literalism for comic relief, and the central mystery is just sort of goofy. It attempts to both tie in with the work of Oscar Wilde and to be a mind-blower on a cosmic scale, but it never really gels. The Wilde tribute just seems lazy, and (spoiler?) "cosmic horror with Dick and Jane" just plain doesn't work. Certainly one of the more ambitious entries in this series, but also one of its low points.
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