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< 2.2 - The Surest Poison
2.4 - Cruel Immortality >

2.3 - Water Like a Stone

Rating Votes
10
6%
1
9
35%
6
8
24%
4
7
24%
4
6
12%
2
5
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Average Rating
8.0
Votes
17

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
6
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: MegaplumfinityReview Date: 9/22/14 5:48 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

An intriguing and atmospheric theatre-set story with the wonderful addition of Lisa Bowerman as new agent; Ruby. Although it begins well unfortunately the story drags in the middle with repetitive scenes of the main characters trapped in unreal scenarios and a lack of real menace. The first episode also seems to be setting up a fascinating plot revolving around a previously unseen S&S adventure but unfortunately this isn't the main thread of the story. Thankfully the final episode does provide a decent conclusion which ends on a haunting note. Nice also to see some wacky PJ Hammond-ish ideas about time and music included.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
NA
Acting Rating:
NA
Replay Rating:
NA
Effects Rating:
NA
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: Planet KlibignaitisReview Date: 9/9/10 3:49 am
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Stories that deliberately take their cues from established literature don't sit well with me. Going through the motions of a classic story strikes me as betraying a lack of inspiration on behalf of the writer - that this is the joint best Sapphire and Steel audio says a lot about Nigel Fairs' skills as the range's mastermind.

Nick Briggs plays Arthur, possibly the best of his many Big Finish roles (second only to the Daleks perhaps). A sympathetic character, Arthur is treated quite badly by Steel, who is splendidly short of manners throughout. We also get to meet Ruby, played by the wonderful Lisa Bowerman, who proves integral to the outcome of the plot.
Suzanne Proctor plays Dolly, the music hall grotesque who's relentless sing-song descends frighteningly from light-heartedness to something altogether more sinister with expertly handled ease.
Finally, Lucy Gaskell features very briefly, but in a scene that is haunting, tragic, eerie and strangely beautiful.

This story is an utter triumph, so much more than the 'Christmas ghost story' the sleevenotes describe it as. A mixture of comedy (Sapphire and Steel as stage turns), the tragic (Arthur and The Girl's backstory) and something delightfully magical. Recommended without hesitation.

(As an aside, the next story 'Cruel Immortality', has sufficent ties with this tale, it could be considered a sequel of sorts - or even the second chapter of one huge, eight episode story.)
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