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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 5/29/17 3:59 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This is a good story where the vision outstrips the execution.

Pay very close attention in stereo. Use headphones. Remember how things worked in the Wrong Doctors? Two Jagos and two Litefoots means one Jago is speaking from the right and the other from the left. Likewise for Litefoot. Sadly I lost track of which was which, but I could still tell them apart and I acknowledge this is a great attempt at a technical masterpiece. There is no dishonour in falling short.

Storywise, it is good and the complexity of the investigating characters (all 6 of them) is balanced by the relative simplicity of the main villain's plot.

The whole series is well worth listening to. Justin Richards knows the characters well and is no novice with them. The acting is good even though the duplicated characters are hard to tell apart.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
2
Acting Rating:
6
Replay Rating:
3
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 5/28/17 1:24 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

In Three's a Crowd, the Doctor, Peri, and Erimen arrive on a colony world where all the colonists are forced to remain apart to focus on physical training to prepare themselves for their return home. But something mysterious is going on.

This is a story that has some nice moments. Deborah Watling's return as Auntie works pretty well and it's nice to hear her in something where she's not straining her voice trying to sound younger. Catherine Morris also has a pretty nice scene in the fourth episode when she realizes one day she'll see the TARDIS disappear forever.

At the same point, the story has a lot of problems. The concept as it comes off is hard to swallow. It seems like one of those over the top stories warning of living life in computers rather than in reality but at a whole new level of over the topness. There are pacing problems, with this feeling padded out and there are logical problems such as the fact that everyone spends all their time in physical training but being kind of rubbish when it comes to anything physical. In addition, the colonists are somewhat annoying. This is lessened a bit by Peri's kindness. If Peri was impatient with them, they would have been a lot harder to put up with. In addition, this story was supposed to be an attempt for Erimen to recover in the events in, "Roof of the World," but that theme is never really developed.

Perhaps, the biggest problem is tone. This could have worked a bit better as a sort of, "Pirates Planet," style comedy. The story took itself so seriously that it seems to produce more, "It's so bad, it's good moments." Such as Auntie's hilarious use of, "Leadership is about making the hard choices." Overall, this wasn't good, but wasn't all that horrible either.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 5/28/17 1:52 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This story is probably most notable for being the audio debut of Miles Richardson as Irving Braxiatel, and this is a very strong story for him. He's definitely playing a supporting role, but a prominent one, and the story does a fine job of establishing him and, more importantly, his relationship with Benny. The story is also nicely straightforward, which seems to be the way to go with these self-contained, small-cast, single-disc stories.

But there's something about the story that just doesn't work for me.It's something to do with the combination of a truly monstrous crime with an incredibly petty motive. I understand that there are plenty of real-life examples of horrible crimes motivated by simple greed, but something about this story bothers me.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
4
Replay Rating:
3
Effects Rating:
4
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 5/27/17 8:13 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Huge improvement on last week - first and foremost, this second part of what's starting to become a real monster of a three-parter, has a genuine plot. There's no information kept from the viewer arbitrarily to foster suspense and events run through in sequential order. It is shocking to identify this as a positive, and sadly reflects the scale of my gripes with the trend the show has taken these past couple of years.

Fortunately, the plot is remarkably unrelated to Extremis, with the Veritas' source still unexplained (part 3 perhaps?) and the monks still very much centre stage. The villains do suffer from some cliches well parodied in Gatiss' sketch show way back in the early 2000's. Lots of whispering 'Doc-tooor' and omnipotent abilities. Some new cliches appear too, with resemblance to the 'Silence' and a fantastic sounding rationale: 'fear is inefficient, we must be loved', that collapses into a pretentious puddle when actually dissected. A Sutekh type villain (heck, bring him back) would essentially push the plot in a similair direction with less head scratching.

Harness also is clearly back in the frame. We've got some concepts of representation and voting (Kill the Moon) with wishy washy contemporary political parallels to force through a general message of 'war = bad' (Zygon Invasion / Inversion). These themes aren't handled particularly in-depth or with much tact, but it's always welcome to see Doctor Who attempting to push beyond its usual borders. Frankly, I'd be far more satisfied if this was a two-parter, junking Extremis and giving these concepts some space to breathe. As it is, we're a bit compressed by the timeslot, with the Doctor solving the mystery (biological experimentation, not nuclear conflict) without any logical steps taken subsequent to an appraisal of evidence. He's the Doctor, he can just make these leaps.

One concept not welcome is the 'President of the World' shtick again, from the Series 8 finale. Watching the Doctor adopt such a mantle with ease is not only cringe inducing - with hokey dialogue and cheapo sets - but its wholly out of character, by Classic Who (President of Gallifrey) and New Who (never stops, never asks to be thanked) standards. There's a fun twist on the Doctor's fallibility towards the end though, very welcome.

As for production, sets again look cheap and the computer effects are wholly binary. The Pyramid work is astonishing, whilst submarines in the desert look like something knocked up on photoshop. The sets for the most part are atrociously cheap (is the Vault an excuse for reusing sets?) whilst the Monks, as last week, look absolutely top notch. Stunt PC casting is prevalent again, with one cast member at least bringing a laugh, albeit for reminding me of Phoenix Nights rather than any sense of foreboding! Direction is mostly uninspired, though there's another case of bizarre stylist choices (smashing bottle in blank space) and erratic editing (do we really need to be reminded about broken glasses minutes after their breaking?). Murray Gold is, after umpteen years, creatively bankrupt, reusing a riff from the Majestic Tale. Musical cues now half a decade old, are being used with reckless abandon. Being deafened by 12th's action theme is always a welcome tedium - especially as characters perform the astonishing feats of using a search engine.

Pains me to keep writing similair reviews, but it's heartbreaking to look back to the announcement that Peter would take the role. I was anxiously awaiting a new age for the show of a more dignified Doctor and a more cerebral take. More concepts, more character, less scale and less shlock. As it is, it's more of the same, Peter Capaldi playing an electric guitar with sonic sunglasses, making sexual innuendos with bland uninspired dialogue. Perhaps Big Finish continues to spoil me, but the gulf between what's been pumped out these last few years and a completely run of the mill monthly range release, is staggering.

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