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< 173. The Lady of Mercia
175. Persuasion >

174. Prisoners of Fate

Rating Votes
10
18%
14
9
30%
23
8
28%
21
7
13%
10
6
7%
5
5
3%
2
4
1%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.3
Votes
76
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 8/10/17 11:17 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A story with a bit of complexity here. The first two episodes have the crew landing in a dystopian society where a seemingly amazing coincidence puts Nyssa in touch with her son she left so many years ago. We have a clear villain in Sibor who is using alien technology to build her political position. There is a full story here, but at the end of the second episode we learn where the alien technology came from and that reveals the true threat and villain of the piece.

Initially the stakes were just the cure to Richter's and the freedom of the main characters, but things are far worse than that. No spoilers, but the way the story is written allows for the escalation of the threat and the movement of the main villain.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 5/26/17 11:37 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Prisoners of Fate works on a number of levels. It begins with a superb concept with a mystery behind it as the Doctor and crew land on a world where a computer that can predict the future also arrests people for crimes that they are going to commit and convicts them before they do so. But it's also a time travel story, a story where Nyssa faces the consequences for her deception of the Doctor and the price is high...never being able to go home again.

Overall, the story works with a great sense of mystery and a payoff in the third episode that really is quite stunning. Each of the stories in this trilogy has tried to focus on one companion with a central conflict. This one with Nyssa was clearly the most effective. The story and the future of the galaxy hinge on a decision she makes. The story has a great sense of drama even while it neatly wraps up some loose plot threads that have been dangling for quite some time at Big Finish.

If the story has a fault, it's the final episode which feels a bit overstuffed and a little more convoluted and plays more time wimey tricks than are strictly necessary. Still, this is a very solid release and easily the best of the trilogy.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: YorickReview Date: 7/17/15 12:59 pm
0 out of 2 found this review helpful.

The story starts off strong with plenty of mysteries and time issues but then kind of fizzles out towards the end with a slight overdose on the paradoxes. Still, enjoyable enough though.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 5/10/15 6:40 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

25 years after Nyssa left her home to find a cure for the deadly virus of Richter's Syndrome, a deadly disease that makes the victim feel as though they are literally boiling in their own bodies, we now spin forward to the planet Valderon, and her son is now on this denial colony researching on a cure for this deadly foe, and instead of guniea pigs and rabbits, he is using the ever growing population of the prisoners. However there is a time conundrum here, Nyssa son thinks that Nyssa his mother is dead, long gone, so as not to cause a rift in time, he initially disguises himself from her. This is due to Nyssa looking younger, and so he thinks that she is the mother before she has had him. How wrong he is on this score. When the Doctor discovers this he wants to take Nyssa away from the timeline, and the guilt of her almost having her life robbed by the Doctor play heavily on his mind. Nyssa however tries to allay the Doctor's fear by insisting that she is the one responsible for her actions and the Doctor should not blame himself over her choices that she has made. Not he.

This brings Nyssa back into the fold, and for the main part she is the main leading character in this outing with the 5th Doctor and three companions in tow. However at the core of this story is something quite unexpected, and that is another TARDIS, which is being used as some sort of future proof, law generating judgement machine.

The thing to remember about this tale, is Morris as done one over on Moffat, in a way that leaves Moffat a little high and dry when it comes to Who and especially Who adventures. Also Morris as provided a little bit of a kick in the right direction for this the 5th Doctor range which in its last two previous outings have been average and nothing more.

This for me gives material that Sutton and Davies have had chance to work with and make it much more of a well rounded adventure. Turlough and Tegan offer themselves more as a voice for the rest of the story, and there isn't this complete loss of the identity of having to manage three companions within a main release range. This is something that I feel does not particular work too well, but is even harder to re-image in audio due to the constraints of the medium. A good release and brings the whole 5th Doctor releases in the main range output for the last round of 5th Doctor outings back on to a stable footing.