Stories:
2802
Members:
704
Submitted Reviews:
7511
Reviewers:
319
< 4.17 - The End of Time
5.2 - The Beast Below >

5.1 - The Eleventh Hour

Rating Votes
10
32%
36
9
33%
37
8
24%
27
7
7%
8
6
1%
1
5
2%
2
4
1%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.8
Votes
112
Director:
Writer:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: MercuryReview Date: 11/20/18 2:10 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The first episode with Matt Smith as The Doctor (apart from his brief appearance after regenerating).

It is an excellent start for Steven Moffatt as 'showrunner' and Smith as the 11th Doctor. The episode is entertaining and well acted. Smith had an extremely hard act to follow as David Tennant as the 10th Doctor was, in my opinion, the best since Tom Baker who was the greatest ever Doctor (the 4th) ....and that is from someone who was actually angry and upset when I heard Tennant had been cast. I was slightly concerned by Smith 's over excited, almost childlike portrayal straight away but overall felt it was a strong debut and the episode has grown on me evn more over time.

The storyline of the alien on the run is not exceptional but is solid quality, fun and enjoyable. The other story elements of having the Doctor arrive at different points of Amy's life and the effect that has on her is what lifts the episode up in quality. Amy and Rory make good first impressions as the new 'companions' and overall the script and story is good. It is quite epic in nature with imminent world destruction threatened, declarations that alien attackers better be scared of the wrath of the Doctor and with flashes of previous Doctors shown in a striking way (the best moment of the episode).

Smith is not as much to my personal taste as Tennant and the story of 'prisoner zero' is solid but not as brilliant as the time travel elements of the story. The CGI effects of the alien monster are not very good and the effect of it appearing to hang down from above does not really make sense to me. Where is it hanging down from? Surely the whole creature should be visible.

Overall the episode is very good indeed and I rate it a very strong 9.5/10.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: BrainofMorbius23Review Date: 8/5/17 10:57 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I'll keep this short...

This is a special way to introduce a new era, it's expertly tackled and Amy is one of the most uniquely brought in companions.

I love this story even if it's not perfect , it just had atmosphere!
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: DalekbusterScreen5ReviewsReview Date: 4/16/17 5:10 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

'How do you begin a new era of a popular TV show when it has just seen arguably its most popular lead actor go?'

That was the question Steven Moffat was faced with for The Eleventh Hour. You would think it would be a challenge to introduce not only a new Doctor and companion in a single episode but an entirely new era too. Yet Moffat does it effortlessly.


The plot is relatively straightforward compared to previous Doctor Who stories (and of course the majority of Steven Moffat's future ones) but with so many new elements to the series to introduce, it had to be. The most complicated it gets is The Doctor (Matt Smith) meeting Amy (Karen Gillan) first as a child, returning 12 years later and eventually picking her up as a companion two years after that. Otherwise, the plot is basically an alien convict resembling a snake has escaped from a crack in Amy's wall and intergalactic police the Atraxi (think a giant eyeball and you're correct) are prepared to incinerate the Earth if they don't find him. In order to blend in, Prisoner Zero takes on the form of various coma patients however Amy's boyfriend Rory (Arthur Darvill) is a nurse at the local hospital and alerts the Doctor and Amy about it. This is probably the most simplistic a Moffat story gets and it helps considerably to introduce this new Doctor and companion.

This is such a great introduction story to a new era that arguably it's as good as the excellent Rose by Russell T Davies - and believe me, to have as good an introduction as Rose is going something. It feels like we've always known Matt Smith and Karen Gillan as the Doctor and Amy; both or them slip into their parts immediately.

Matt Smith is so good, in fact, that he has his defining Doctor moment in his very first episode. There's this wonderful scene where the Atraxi shows the Doctor's incarnations in order scanning at the Doctor's request on whether the Earth is protected...and he steps through and says just four words.

'Hello, I'm the Doctor'

Immediately, you know who this Doctor is. It is only beaten in terms of the Matt Smith Era by another moment later on in series 5 known as the 'Pandorica speech'. The thing is, Matt Smith was so great here that I was disappointed when he didn't seem as comfortable in the following episode The Beast Below. In fact, his performance in series 5 never quite reached the heights of how he played the Doctor here. I feel he was better in series 6 and 7 overall but I suppose that's to be expected considering he would have been more comfortable in the part by then.

As for Karen Gillan, she sold me straight away as the feisty Amy Pond. Her no nonsense approach is brilliant, especially when she traps the Doctor's tie in a car door or wracks him over the head with a cricket bat. She quickly became my favourite companion for a while until the excellent Jenna Coleman came along as Oswin/Victorian Clara/Clara.

Oh, and I can't write this review without mentioning Caitlin Blackwood. I'm sure many fellow Whovians will agree with me when I say she is without a doubt the best child actor they have ever had in the show. She's a smart casting choice, looking exactly like a young Karen Gillan (helps that they are cousins, of course) and also coming across incredibly believable in the part to the point where you wouldn't mind if she ended up playing the new companion rather than Karen Gillan.

Overall, The Eleventh Hour is exactly how to do an era introduction story with fantastic acting from the new stars of the show and a brilliant simplistic plot from Steven Moffat that was just what this episode needed.