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< 6.12 - The Rings of Ikiria
7.2 - The Uncertainty Principle >

7.1 - The Time Museum

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10
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Average Rating
7.7
Votes
64
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Reviewed By: joehurl89Review Date: 10/21/16 10:48 am
0 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Sound editing sucked, I couldn't even understand half of it. What a waste.
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Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/15/15 5:17 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.


Recorded on 12 October 2011, 'The Time Museum' by James Gross features a reference to every televised story that 'Ian' appeared in as well as some lost stories such as 'The Masters of Luxor'. Stylistically it’s similar to 'Solitaire' but doesn't have that same vein of surrealism, or much of a plot. Like 'Deadline' in the unbound range it’s more of a character study, and unlike other 'Companion Chronicles' isn't narrated.

An older 'Ian Chesterton' wakes up in a replica of his bedroom on earth dazed and confused and is soon finding himself chased through the Ian Chesterton exhibit by ravenous monsters that want to feed on his memories. The curator of the museum 'Pendolin' guides him through the exhibit in search of safety as 'Ian' is forced to relive his travels with ‘The Doctor’ as his memory comes under attack.

William Russell has lost nothing, absolutely nothing with age and plays well of Philip Pope who plays 'Pendolin', who has been using his time scoop to fill his museum. There isn't much of a musical background but when it’s more dialogue driven less is definitely more, but it does have the original and in my eyes the best version of the 'Doctor Who' theme tune.

The whole thing is a wonderfully emotive walk through the two years 'Ian' spent with 'The Doctor', but it is 'Ian's' greatest hits. Don't expect lots of thrills but there are enough details and humour to make this captivating in its own unusual way.
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/20/15 9:08 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

An older Ian Chesterton awakes to find himself in the Chesterton exhibit of the Time Museum. He's been grabbed out of time and awakened by the curator and told they have to run as creatures are prepared to feed on his memories. Ian runs through the museum and finds himself reliving all of his adventures with the Doctor including Lost Stories. The stories become jumbled and he begins to lose them.

Unlike most other Companion Chronicles, this is one of three two handers featuring no narration as Ian and the curator run through the museum from the monsters. Both pull it off well and there's a great deal of suspense as well as a nice touch of nostalgia. The one thing I didn't like is Goss' dialogue which almost has Ian thinking the Doctor was right to try to kill the caveman in the first story which is disconcerting. However, that aside, this was very interesting and well-told tale and it's always a delight to hear William Russell reprising the role of Ian.

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Reviewed By: PaulaPenguinReview Date: 6/14/13 12:12 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

The Time Museum is very much a character study and there is rather little going on in terms of actual plot. I don't think it is necessary to have heard/watched any stories in particular, but some general knowledge about the early days of the First Doctor will certainly come in handy in order to understand and enjoy this tale. James Goss paints some nice pictures in his depiction of this era, but overall the story was a little too self-referential for my liking. Especially the first half is a bit dull due to the lack of real plot development. However, I absolutely love the ending. I did see the twist coming, but that didn't spoil my enjoyment, because the writing in those final scenes is utterly gorgeous and William Russell's delivery is just beautiful and very fitting.