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< 2.3 - School Reunion
2.5 - Rise of the Cybermen >

2.4 - The Girl in the Fireplace

Rating Votes
10
43%
59
9
26%
36
8
15%
20
7
11%
15
6
4%
5
5
0%
0
4
1%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.9
Votes
136
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Writer:

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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: MercuryReview Date: 12/1/18 1:15 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This episode is, like many classic series greats, not perfect but better than the sum of its parts. It has a few flaws but they are totally outweighed by the great aspects so that it still easily manages to get 9.5/10 from me.

The Doctor, Rose and Mickey travel to a 51st Century spaceship where they mysteriously find parts of the ship replaced with human body parts and scenes from 18th Century Versailles apparently taking place on board with menacing clockwork robots to deal with.

The motivations of the Doctor and Madame de Pompadour do not always seem immediately to fully make sense and the human body parts are a strange idea but there is a magic to this episode that mostly transcends that similar to how The Talons of Weng Chiang totally transcends its giant rats. The clockwork robots are very creepy and effective and they look fabulous. The acting of Sophia Myles is great and her character is brilliant, engaging and remarkably deep for a one off guest. Rose and Mickey add some nice dynamics and humour. David Tennant is superb and the story is fun, exciting and, at times, moving.

Future Showrunner Moffatt shows his characteristics here with a plot involving complicated interactions with time and cool ideas which do not necessarily make sense entirely (why does the Doctor fall in love, a very unusual act for him, especially having met the girl first when she was only a little girl and why does arriving after her death mean he cannot ever visit her during her life?) but with some ambitious themes/ideas and quality entertainment.

9.5/10
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/15/15 9:48 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

OK, the focus is on Reinette so it's quite character driven, which means something else has to suffer. The is only so much room for the ideas to be fleshed out. The first victim is the robots, dumb automatons, they should be easy to beat right? Then there is the idea that the ship is using human body parts in lieu of proper spares, OK, I can just about except that, but these compromises are made for the Reinette character. I don't have a problem with character or actress, both are great, but it's the Doctor's eagerness to bundle her off into his Tardis, why? If Madame De Pomadour is a historical figure and he takes if in the Tardis and she gets killed or something then wouldn't that mess with history? I think the idea of the Doctor travelling with historical companions is a bad one, and Yes I know Mary Shelly did in Big Finish but that's Big Finish and I am not sure they even made the most of that. It just doesn't sit right with me, he already has Rose and Micky, if he was alone I could buy it, still I enjoy this episode immensely. It's different and emotive, or at least tries to be.

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 11/2/15 4:07 am
0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Girl in the Fireplace works because it combines elements of so many different types of stories and somehow manages to make a coherent and compelling story. Horror, Romance, Time Travel, Fantasy, and Historical Fiction all are at work here giving this a broad appeal.

David Tennant has a great performance as the Doctor in a performance that has him running a range of emotions. Sophia Myles is superb as Madame de Pompadour and has great chemistry with Tenant.

It also features Rose showing Mickey the ropes of the Companion, though the companions are mostly overshadowed by Tennant, Myles, and all the other story elements at work in this episode.