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< 46. Flip-Flop
48. Davros >

47. Omega

Rating Votes
10
17%
27
9
18%
29
8
29%
47
7
23%
37
6
8%
13
5
2%
4
4
4%
6
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.9
Votes
163
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User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
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Replay Rating:
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9
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Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 7/5/17 8:19 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

So technically this follows on from "Arc of Infinity", but I honestly don't think there's anything in this story that requires familiarity with that one. They don't join up terribly well as it is, since Omega appears to be destroyed at the end of that story. So don't worry if you're not up on your Omega lore... just jump right in.

Of course, everyone talks about the cliffhanger to Part Three, because it's simply one of the most mind-bending cliffhangers ever. It's audaciously conceived and extremely well-executed. It's actually a risky kind of cliffhanger, one that totally changes the nature of the story once you're (presumably) already invested in it. But this cliffhanger only deepens the story. It's not a cheat, and it doesn't clumsily supercede anything that came before it. It just changes everything.

But for all the attention that cliffhanger gets, it pulls focus from the rest of the story, which is uniformly wonderful from start to finish. The characters are vivid and memorable, and the entire cast does a great job. We even get Conrad Westmaas making his Big Finish debut. Ian Collier and Peter Davison deserve special recognition for their performances. I don't have anything against Stephen Thorne, but I much prefer Ian Collier's interpretation of Omega. He can do all the shouty bits just fine, but he's got a better line in quiet menace, and he's better suited to the complex, sympathetic depiction of Omega featured in this story.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 11/12/15 10:42 pm
3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Omega is the opening play to the first real trilogy of stories which would become the staple of the Main Range of Big Finish. Dubbed the Villains' Trilogy, it was released leading up to the 40th Anniversary special, Zagreus. Peter Davison received the first release of the trilogy in an adventure taking place in the final moments of the television story Arc of Infinity and we get to see exactly what became of Omega. While this may be a bit continuity heavy it isn't so much that you have to have seen Arc of Infinity and The Three Doctors do fully appreciate this story. Fountain has a great script with Peter Davison and Ian Collier getting to work off each other with banter much like the Doctor and Davros. The story also has some great twists especially at the third cliffhanger where many of the story's flaws are fixed so when you think you spot the plot holes, they are explained in a satisfactory manor.

The only real flaw of the story is that it wasn't originally meant to be for Omega as a villain, but the Celestial Toymaker. Now that isn't really the problem but there are points where that original story bleeds through as some lines are satires of Doctor Who tropes. The pre-credits scene and closing monologues, while amazing, are obviously meant for the other story once you find out the backstory of who is saying the monologue. Some of the twists in Part Four are much like what The Celestial Toymaker, could have been but it doesn't fit with the themes of the story.

The story is still brilliant and looking ahead at the rest of the story, this is the weakest link, which is saying a lot as it is a brilliant story with only a few out of place jokes bringing it down.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
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10
Has Prerequisite(s):
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Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 10/2/15 2:51 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

"He is just a non-corporeal mass of psionic ectoplasm"

So much for progress!

What a mundane setting for an adventure. It begins with a couple discussing their broken relationship followed by the Doctors conversation with an elderly passenger. Timelords reduced to time tourists that lack a genuine appreciation of society. Hardly as god like as they claim or perceive themselves to be. It was originally set to feature the Celestial Toymaker instead of Omega.

The premise of Omega wanting to elope to his parallel universe because he is home sick with his new bride is rather interesting. An institutionalized dimension jumping, randy and narcissistic god/timelord of unsound mind and body with telepathic powers is a winner with me every time. Unfortunately the voice actor 'Ian Collier' who obviously played Omega in 'The Arc of Infinity' sounds very much like The Black Guardian in this which gets a bit irritating and confusing.

Palix the Time Plumber carries on the theme of mixing the exotic and the mundane and for me typifies this story as a whole which wildly veers between the two. This one constantly surprises me, the plot twists and turns, a slow start builds to a pacey finish. Tardises grieving, this story is as unpredictable and intelligent as its central character. A rather slow start that builds up to a fantastic finish for our favorite corporeally challenged fiend. If only the eighties had been this good.

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Unsure
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 3/13/15 3:36 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

At first glance, it appears that Peter Davison drew the short straw compared to his two immediate successors. In the trilogy of stories themed around the Doctor's greatest villain, the Sixth and Seventh Doctor were pitted against the Doctor's most celebrated individual foes, Davros and the Master. The Fifth Doctor is left with Omega, a character who appeared in only two Doctor Who stories and in neither story was Omega highly regarded by fans.

Yet, I think writer Nev Fountain deserves credit for seeing the opportunity this provided: To flesh out the details of the life of Omega, a legendary Time Lord and how he came to be the sort of man we saw in the Classic series. There's some great stuff in this story as we really get a much better picture of Omega than we did in either of his two TV appearances. There's also a nice moment when the Doctor discusses how Omega inspired him and the similarity between the two men (though that has a different meaning later on in the story.)

Davison is in fine form as the Fifth Doctor. Playing the role as a mix of strength, compassion, and cheek. Also there's a great twist at the end of Part 3 that requires some flexibility which Davison shows in spades as the psychological drama and the relationship between the Doctor and Omega really move the story forward in Part Four.

Fountain's writing is very strong for the most part. The story has a bit of satire of tourist and tourism, as well as a stereotypical hammy actor, and other lighter elements. In some ways, Fountain reminds me of Gareth Roberts. The downside in Omega is that it does lead to a bit of confusion over the tone of the peace. There's a probably tad more comedy than the plot requires or can comfortably support. The old lady tourists got to be a bit of a tired gag.

Overall, this story works for its clever and surprising twist, a wonderful performance by Davison, and by fleshing out a character that too often felt one-dimensional in the classic series.