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< 29. The Chimes of Midnight
31. Embrace the Darkness >

30. Seasons of Fear

Rating Votes
10
21%
43
9
30%
61
8
28%
57
7
12%
24
6
8%
16
5
1%
2
4
1%
2
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0%
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Average Rating
8.4
Votes
205
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Reviewed By: bron_snowReview Date: 9/28/17 11:11 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Such a wonderful romp. As an outing that draws together so many small elements from past stories and hints at multiple future stories, there could have been a real danger of this being a mess, but the end result is a gem of Eighth's earlier audios.

Without the budgetary constraints of TV, audio is the perfect medium for the TARDIS to spend an episode quickly hopping through time periods with a little more purpose than usual, and the multiple changes in scenery keep the pace roaring along. Paul McGann and India Fisher feel particularly playful and lively in this outing, and are both given some of their most fun banter and dialogue, but of special note are the half dozen or so guest characters who pop up in the course of the story. They're all played magnificently, and are refreshingly fleshed out. You get a glimpse into all of their lives, and they all feel as if they live and exist outside of the brief moments of peril in which The Doctor happens to be passing through. A real celebration of attention to character detail. I'm particularly fond of the couple of chatty Roman blokes they cross paths with in part one.

A well paced story that does a particularly good job of navigating the problems inherent in hanging onto the lengthy four part structure. Fun and exciting, with some great character moments for all involved. Oh, also Nimon.
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Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 6/16/17 4:54 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Another winner. I don't know where to begin. Stephen Perring's performance is a particular highlight. He plays Grayle at every point through his long history, and the climactic confrontation highlights how well Perring's performance captured the character's development. And it's a great part. Not only a Grayle a wonderfully meaty villain, but the time-traveling plot means the story takes us directly through his backstory. So Perring gets to sink his teeth into a diabolically arch "Doctor Who" villain while in the same story exploring his his more sympathetic origins.

I also love hos the script makes use of the episodic structure. It's a bit like "The Chase", which each episode focusing on a new location and a new batch of supporting characters.

Finally, the story present an effective ramping up of the gradually unfolding story of Charley's Paradox. (Don't worry, I won't repeat my criticisms again here.) The sudden appearance of Don Warrington at the end in an as yet unidentified role offers an intriguing glimpse of what's ahead. And then there's that ludicrous Dalek cameo in Part One. I love that! But of course it's the stinger at the end that really drives up the tension. There's definitely trouble ahead for the Doctor and Charley....
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Reviewed By: drwhatPieter2Review Date: 1/6/17 2:53 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This time we have a defferent story unlike the sinister spookieness from Chimes of Midnight, but Paul Cornell' and Caroline Symcox "Seasons of of Fear is equally spectaclular like the last one."

The Doctor and Charley are visiting Singapore 1930 to visit a friend of Charley's. But the Doctor was confronted a conversation with an immortal man called Sabastian Grayle who claimes that he killed the Doctor in the past for his masters who gave his immortallity and they want roam the whole universe in exchange, And the Doctor just realised that it might be happing in his future. So the doctor and must get back in time to prevent the dangers that are happening.
So Tha Doctor and Charley are chasing Grayle through time with the TARDIS from the Roman empire period to the the Dark ages to than the Regency period.

The whole plot looks like stories from the Harnell era "Keys of Marinus, the Chase and Daleks Masterplan. A story with each episode with a different style of adventure. And there is also a bit of a suprise with an unusual classic Who monster that are returning. Like in the Lawrance Miles did in his novel "Alien Bodies. There are some ideas from Paul Cornell and Caroline Symcox in this story that Steven Moffat" took over in the episodes "Pandorica Opens and Big Bang". And the ending is a bit of an over-arcing element from Storm Warning and the upcoming adventure Neverland

Paul Mgann and India Fisher are in top form here as always. And Stephen Perring is very manacing as Grayle. Gary Russell did a splendid job as director the pacing was nicely done. The music was also good work. Jane Elphinstone music was quet action pact thing. This story is quet impressive and i love every minute to listen.

10/10 Great sci-fi/action/adventure
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 1/13/16 11:49 am
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.


It seems to be a recurring theme in Audio Doctor Who with the Doctor encountering a villain multiple times and occasionally out order (see the Ghosts of N-Space and the Excelis saga). This story far easier to do over audio whereas doing it right on television requires too many sets and just becomes too expensive. It may have never been done better than it was here. The story begins in 1930 when the Doctor finally brings Charley to Signapore only to discover Sebastian Crail, a man he's never met before declaring he's one of the Doctor's lifelong enemies and that he's killed the Doctor already.

The Doctor gets Charley and they set about to solve the mystery, travelling to London in three different times: during Roman occupation, the middle ages, and then during the mid-19th century. Each era is created with exquisite detail. My favorite was the Doctor's visit to Edward the Confessor and Edith.

Also worthy of praise is Stephen Perring as the ever-changing Sebastian Grayle. It really makes the episode.

This story is a lot of fun as the actions of Grayle's masters allow the Doctor to meddle even more than usual. Fans of the new series will have to smile at the Doctor's use of, "Geronimo" when diving into the vortex. The story also includes a nice theory of the truth behind the Mithra legend.

In addition, the story moved along the season long arc nicely, not the least of which was having Charley and the Doctor interacting together.