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< 1.3 - The Longest Night
Unit - Dominion >

1.4 - The Wasting

Rating Votes
10
26%
9
9
11%
4
8
29%
10
7
9%
3
6
17%
6
5
6%
2
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
3%
1
1
0%
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Average Rating
7.9
Votes
35
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: Drew VogelReview Date: 8/12/17 10:31 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

An effective if unspectacular finale to an effective if unspectacular spin-off series. This story finally picks up and pays off the dangling plot threads from "Time Heals", involving the theft of an alien spacecraft and the disappearance of UNIT Col. Ross Brimmicombe-Wood. The story also involves a mysterious "plague" which turns out to be related to the alien spacecraft. Interestingly, there are no actual aliens. That's not a bad thing, as the story works just fine as it is. It's just a little surprising that we've gotten through a whole four-part UNIT miniseries without any aliens. Even the Silurians, who aren't exactly aliens anyway, only get a mention. I wonder if that was a deliberate effort to make the series more grounded, or if it just happened to work out that way.

I don't really have much to say about this episode in particular. It's got a good pace, plenty of action, a couple of nice twists along the way. It does a few small things that bother me frankly more than they should. For example, Lethbridge-Stewart shows up with a very convenient device that allows Emily to monitor to telephone conversations. When asked about its legality, he just shrugs off the question. This is practically a post-9/11 cliché, and that's partly why it bothers me. But more than that... it makes UNIT just another unaccountable rogue government agency. That bothers me a lot, actually. When even the good guys don't understand what it means to be the good guys, then they're not really the good guys at all.

As for the series as a whole..., it's not at all bad, and I'm disappointed that it didn't continue. However, I'm not at all sure how it would have continued, as it totally failed to establish any basis for an ongoing series. This is frankly perplexing, as it seemed to be doing a good job of that until Hoffman and Dalton were suddenly both killed off in "The Longest Night". Now it's just Chaudhry, with Lethbridge-Stewart as her unofficial scientific advisor (a really stupid idea). A second series would have had to introduce new regular characters and establish what a modern UNIT might look like, because this series never bothered to do that.

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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
6
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/6/15 9:39 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

This story was probably the best of the early Unit series, but still left a bit to be desired.The set up for a virus that transforms humans into monsters is well done. There's also a nice plot twist regarding one characters that's probably even more shocking if you listened to every installment in this series.

However, the story has two principle faults. First and foremost was the pure number of convenient contrivances used to resolve this story usually with the help of Lethbridge Stewart who is continually showing up to give Colonel Chaundry one plot device or another. In addition, the politics gets a tad heavy handed at times.

The strength of the episode is the acting of Nicholas Courtney as the "retired" U.N.I.T. command. He sounds just as he did in the 1970s and fully in command. David Tennant doesn't show up until half way through but is excellent as the crusty Colonel Ross Brimmicombe-Wood, though they had him delivering some rubbish lines towards the end.