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< 11.2 - The Ghost Monument
11.4 - Arachnids in the UK >

11.3 - Rosa

Rating Votes
10
18%
13
9
24%
17
8
24%
17
7
18%
13
6
7%
5
5
3%
2
4
4%
3
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
1%
1
Average Rating
7.9
Votes
71
Director:
Writer:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
9
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7
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Reviewed By: The31stWAHReview Date: 4/20/19 9:07 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I'm going to probably just echo a lot of the other existing sentiments about this episode, so let me keep things brief by saying this is a broad but deeply necessary episode of Doctor Who, one which officially brings the talented Malorie Blackman to the televised version of the show where she belongs and ALMOST gets to some important points about the Doctor's own wrote privelige. Even considering the books and audio series, it's astounding how seldom Doctor Who has centered around a nonwhite historical figure.

Dodgy accents aside, the only real sticking point for me was the way Krasko was dispensed with. A villain unable to harm the heroes is interesting intellectually but not that dramatically satisfying, and Ryan's actions seem to contradict the Doctor's instructions with no real consequences from her.

Still, as " 'Back to the Future' but with Rosa Parks' " this episode is pretty solid, and it at least attempts to explore the complexities of doing the right thing in a constricted, segregated society.

In 2018, it's important for these messages to come across: Racism is bad. White supremacy is bad. And even the best-intentioned allies need to realize when the story isn't about them. "Rosa" goes for big, obvious moments, but it's trying to say a lot of the right things unapologetically.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
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10
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Reviewed By: PilordeReview Date: 12/17/18 8:22 am
1 out of 3 found this review helpful.

This is it. Most of the episodes of the season are good, but this one is one of the few that really shines on it's own.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
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Reviewed By: MercuryReview Date: 11/23/18 1:51 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

My rating: 8.5/10

This story has imperfections which I will discuss but also has a lot of positives but there is a lot of nonsense being talked about this series of Doctor Who in 2018 claiming it has gone mad with political correctness. This episode is one at which that is levelled although on the other side there is a lot of praise for this episode. I feel that division in society is as bad as ever with political situations around the world featuring a lot of extremism and hatred. This episode does feature a focus on similar divisions and hatred occurring in 1950s and 1960s USA but how is that supposed to be political correctness? It is social comment and using a story to talk about issues affecting some of the audience. I suggest people calling it political correctness makes it look like they have bias and prejudices of a not very pleasant kind because is equality between races political correctness or just basic human decency? Surely every single person should feel not judging by somebody's colour or race is necessary in order to be a decent person and to have a decent society. It is not political correctness to raise this issue in times where hatred and division is very apparent. It is the same as classic Doctor Who constantly bringing up issues of ecology/people damaging the environment or antiwar/antifascist themes or allegories about the exploitation of workers.

What is true is that writing of stories tackling issues needs to be done well just like any other story and there are a few bits of dialogue in this and subsequent episodes which are a bit clumsily written and directed. In any scene involving any social issues those clumsy moments get jumped on for sounding preachy but really it is just bits of less successful execution of script and/or direction. In this episode there are bits of clumsy presentation but there are also scenes written and directed very well and some very powerful scenes. Rosa Parks herself is brilliantly represented and well acted and the Doctor and her friends are mostly good with only occasional lapses where dialogue feels unnatural. Bradley Walsh as Graham continues to do a superb job. In terms of writing you have to remember they have to make this family friendly which sometimes compromises the writing a bit.

Production values in series 11 are the best in Doctor Who history and the period setting is convincing, atmospheric and beautiful to look at. The music is also great although the use of a modern song instead of a period one for the dramatic climactic scene on the bus was not what I would have chosen and I would not have replaced the end title music with it either. It did not ruin the episode for me though.

Despite the clumsy moments I did find this story moving and interesting and feel it was an excellent concept to visit this event. The villain and his motives are not all that well presented though. I am not sure Krasco convinces as a far future white supremacist murderer. It is true, sadly, that such people might still exist in far future but his thinking, his plan and his characterisation could have been presented in a better, more believable way. I would have preferred him to be a modern day or near future white supremacist who got his hands on some alien time travel technology or used an alien race somehow to take him there to alter history. This being said, it was not clearly illogical or bad it was just the least well done part of an overall high quality episode.

Doctor Who, and indeed science fiction as a whole, has always brought issues of the day up by highlighting those issues in a fictional, futuristic or historical setting. Perhaps people who do not like this happening in this series are actually reacting because it is highlighting things that they think and suggests they are wrong? Anyway, this was a very enjoyable, sometimes moving and well produced episode communicating very big issues in a family friendly way. It works very well as an educational historical in the tradition of original 1963-1966 Doctor Who. It also works as pure entertainment even though it has some imperfections.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
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8
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Reviewed By: HoovianReview Date: 11/6/18 5:48 pm
0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

A very emotional story, ti really got me at the end. My only problem is I don't think the villain was handled quite correctly.