Stories:
2763
Members:
692
Submitted Reviews:
7229
Reviewers:
313
< 13.4 - Too Much Reality

14. Jago & Litefoot Forever

Rating Votes
10
27%
3
9
27%
3
8
36%
4
7
0%
0
6
0%
0
5
0%
0
4
9%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.5
Votes
11
Cover Art:
Director:
Music:
Sound Design:
Sound Design:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 6/21/18 6:25 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

e aftermath of Series Thirteen was resolved through exposition by Jago. Professor Litefoot has disappeared and Jago begins looking for him with the help of old friends, but finds his own memory starting to fade. The plot has some nice twists and a few red herrings thrown in to keep the listener guessing. However, for Jago and Litefoot, the plot is about average for the series though with some high points in it.

Much of the running time is taken up by flashback scenes as Jago and other characters recall past adventures. In addition, Professor Litefoot is given a part in the proceedings by copying dialouge from previous stories into this one. Writer Paul Morris went through the more than sixty scripts that’d been performed over the years to find lines he could give the Professor. The one unavoidable flaw with this approach is that often Litefoot’s delivery feels unnatural to the context of the play.

With the use of clips and previously recorded dialogue, the cynic might compare this to Trail of the Pink Panther, the critically panned sixth Pink Panther film made after star Peter Sellers died. Trail used clips of previous Pink Panther movies and outtakes from previous films. It’s a point that producer David Richardson addresses in the extras. I think that Despite the superficial similarity, Jago and Litefoot Forever is something entirely different.

The writing is still solid, if not remarkable. Other than the somewhat awkward use of Baxter’s old lines, the production values remain high. The release succeeds as a tribute to Baxter and to the series with the return of several beloved guest stars including Colin Baker and Louise Jameson. The ending also serves as a nice capstone for the series.

Jago and Litefoot Forever was made with obvious love and respect for the series. It’s not intended for new listeners. However, for long-time fans, it provides a chance to properly say goodbye to a great series and is definitely worth a listen.