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< 236. Serpent in the Silver Mask
238. The Lure of the Nomad >

237. The Helliax Rift

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10
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7
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6
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Average Rating
6.0
Votes
11
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
NR
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Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 8/14/18 4:45 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

It may have been a mistake to get a Torchwood writer to tell a UNIT story. This does not feel like a UNIT story. There are only two UNIT officers in it anyway. There is no continuity with any previous UNIT officers, so it just feels wrong.

The whole thing seems to move very slowly with the first two episodes struggling to tell one episode's worth of story. The stand-in companion is fairly uninteresting.

There is not much to the story. The doctor is looking for aliens and finds UNIT also looking for aliens and someone else has found the aliens and nobody trusts anyone else.

There is a nice revelation in part 3, there are some nice moral questions being asked, though not being argued very well and simply not much else to recommend with this release.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
Plot Rating:
5
Acting Rating:
5
Replay Rating:
5
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: thisoldcanReview Date: 4/22/18 2:07 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

The Helliax Rift is a pretty average story. Handcock has some promising threads in his story, and the plot, while a retread at times, is interesting enough, but he fails to really deliver anything decisively interesting in his story, instead relying on tried and true “UNIT story” tropes to carry the story through the finish line. Peter Davison is generally stronger than he usually is in solo stories, and gives a decent performance, while “companion du jour”, Blake Harrison, has a bit of difficulty conveying a range of emotions in his performance. The guest cast, especially Russ Bain and Deborah Thomas, are generally strong and help to make Handcock’s script a reality pretty well. But the story just can’t really do much more than just sort of exist; it’s not a bad story, by any stretch of the imagination, but it’s just a story with potential that frustratingly squanders it in favor of telling a story that retreads old ground, in more ways than one.