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< 5.4 - The Shadow in the Water
6.X - The Adventure of the Fleet Street Transparency >

6.1 - The Master of Blackstone Grange

Rating Votes
10
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9
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1
8
75%
3
7
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6
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Average Rating
8.3
Votes
4
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 7/3/18 5:03 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The length of this one is a little intimidating, but it gives space for the story to unfold and for characters to be introduced.
There are moments that might not have got as much attention in a shorter play, but here they are told and are often significant.

A mysterious house with a dangerous owner, a history in America and a new visit from Colonel Moran.

Jonathan Barnes knows how to write Holmes just as Briggs and Earl know how to play them.

It is worth the long listen.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/25/18 12:16 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Holmes is bored by the lack of a challenge now that Professor Moriarty is gone. However, when Watson's Barber is distraught because of some strange problem he's having with his wife, Watson sees a case that can get Holmes out of of his doldrums. While Holmes is initially interested, that interest wanes when Moriarty's henchman, Colonel Sebastian Moran is released from prison.

The plot of this story borrows a lot from other Doyle work. The story pays homage to both The Valley of Fear and Hound of the Baskervilles. Yet, this doesn't stop the story from having its own original plot and mystery, but helps to set up the story and give it a sense of authenticity.

The performances are solid as usual. Nicholas Briggs is a very good audio Holmes, able to adjust his performance to capture different aspects and eras in Holmes life. Here, he manages to play mostly to Holmes' melancholoy and do so quite skillfully. Richard Earl is the consumate Watson, and in this story, we get to see a little of the widowed Watson. The rest of the cast is very competent, but Harry Peacock deserves special praise for his performance as one of the villains Honest Jim Sheedy. Peacock is able to play Sheedy alternately as charming and menacing in ways that are equally convincing.

The entire production is punctuated by a wonderful score from Jamie Robertson which really captures the feeling of late 19th Century England perfectly.