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< 10.6 - Extremis
10.8 - The Lie of the Land >

10.7 - The Pyramid at the End of the World

Rating Votes
10
2%
1
9
16%
9
8
39%
22
7
29%
16
6
7%
4
5
5%
3
4
2%
1
3
0%
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2
0%
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1
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Average Rating
7.5
Votes
56
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Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
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7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
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7
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Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 12/13/17 1:12 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A flashy and fun to watch the episode that finds the Doctor and Bill in the real world confronting the Monks, with the Doctor acting as President of the World.

The story is fun, with lots of cool imagery, intriguing clues such as every clock in the world becoming a Doomsday Clock, and some good guest performances. However, the entertainment value is on a surface level for the most part as there are many problems and logical challenges that lurk beneath, starting with the Doctor being the President of Earth and no one thinking they have to take his commands.

Still, the show is fun with a very intense cliffhanger setting up the finale.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
8
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8
Replay Rating:
5
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9
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Reviewed By: JMChurch25Review Date: 6/26/17 8:18 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Part 2 of what is being termed 'The Monk Trilogy' sees a mysterious ancient pyramid appear overnight at the crossroads between the 3 most powerful nations in the world. With the Doctor once again acting as President of Earth, the TARDIS team are called upon to determine its purpose and by extension what the Monks are up to as well as keep tension at bay. But something deadly is happening elsewhere in a lab in Yorkshire that could change everything. What do the Monks actually know and why are they so confident that the world will ask for their help and thus their takeover? This is one of the darkest and most realistic episodes of New Who that I've yet seen even with the pacing being more or less reduced to a crawl. It feels like something that could actually genuinely happen in comparison to some of the other invasion stories the show has done and it shows how the tiniest little details can cause such a massive catastrophe in the end. While we still don't know much about them, the Monks' plan is simple but very effective in the end with one thread tangling in to the other. They can easily stop what's coming but with only pure and loving consent from the human race. It feels appropriately enough like a computer program being installed on a computer without knowing what it actually does. You have to consent before knowing and understanding what collateral damage you may or may not bring. The convergence of all of the plot threads together worked really well but I have to admit that it did get a little tedious and boring at times partially due to the slow pacing. But the story is so interesting and so genuinely real that I didn't even really notice until about the halfway mark. The performances are minimal but Capaldi and Potts really sell the drama especially as the climax goes down between the two of them. With Bill not actually knowing the Doctor's physical weakness, the secret is not only revealed but happens to be what tips the scales over to the wrong side. In a unique twist for New Who where love is often what saves the day, this time it's love that dooms the world and it's a really unique twist that I'm very curious to see play out in the final part. This episode however is definitely a step down from the previous episode with some major problems. As I said, it does get very dull at times especially in the middle of the episode, there were some plot holes that even I noticed, and some rather dull cliches such as the Doomsday clock and the timer before the final explosion. There's also the fact that Doctor Who still can't really pull off big military stories that well especially when they are this realistic. It certainly did and always does it best but it still didn't quite gel as well as it should've. But for what it's worth, 'Pyramid' is still a great episode and a good continuation of the story with major foreshadowing and connections not only to the desolation of Part 3 and the return of Missy but even to the Doctor's forthcoming regeneration itself.
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10
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10
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Reviewed By: DalekbusterScreen5ReviewsReview Date: 6/10/17 8:20 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Three parters are a strange beast for the new series of Doctor Who. The first parts either act as prequels to the second and third episode or a totally unconnected story, and whether they even count as 'three parters' is always a hot topic for discussion in the Whovian fandom. Personally I tend to count the prequel-part two-part three structure as a three part and the 'unconnected story' structure as something separate. That means Turn Left/The Stolen Earth/Journey's End and Name/Day/Time Of The Doctor are not three parters in my book, but Utopia/The Sound Of Drums/Last Of The Time Lords on the other hand certainly is.

Extremis/The Pyramid At The End Of The World/The Lie Of The Land counts too.



The strange thing is that whilst all three are a part of the same story, at the same time they explore three completely different areas of science fiction. The first part, Extremis, is set inside a Matrix-style computer simulation run by the Monks as a way to plan a successful invasion of Earth. Pyramid At The End of The World, meanwhile, is an apocalyptic episode where the Monks are using the approaching doomsday as leverage to persuade the United Nations and leaders of the three most powerful armies in the world - America, Russia and China - to give consent for the Monks to invade. The Lie of The Land, meanwhile, is set in an alternate dystopian world where the Monks have been given consent and Bill (Pearl Mackie) and Nardole (Matt Lucas) are the only ones who know the truth.




It's a clever format for the three parter, and a great way to keep things fresh.

The second part - The Pyramid At The End Of The World, written by Peter Harness - is definitely my favourite of the three, and a massive improvement on Extremis. It's a return to the more straightforward plots of the rest of Series 10; a simple, easy to follow end of the world storyline that demonstrates the power the Monks hold. A mysterious pyramid has appeared overnight, and The Doctor, Bill and Nardole travel with the previously mentioned U.N. and military leaders to investigate. The pyramid turns out to be the Monks' ship and base of operations, and they offer to save humanity from the approaching apocalypse if they give their consent to invade.




The Pyramid At The End Of The World is without a doubt the best episode of Series 10 so far, and it's hard to find much fault with it. It's well-paced, expertly directed and as with some of my favourite Moffat era stories such as The Impossible Astronaut/Day of the Moon and The Zygon Invasion/The Zygon Inversion it has a nice epic feel. This is an episode that could easily be broadcast on the big screen with its sweeping desert vistas and it wouldn't look out of place. It also presents a wonderful irony to the approaching apocalypse, when the end of the world turns out to be taking place in a small British laboratory in a Yorkshire village.




It's a clever move by Peter Harness to make the end of the world be caused by a simple mistake from a male and female scientist duo; the man who turned up to the lab drunk and the woman having broke her glasses on the way to work. Not a massive catastrophe or a third world war as often portrayed in apocalyptic films but simple human mistakes. Doctor Who feels right exploring the very scary idea that the end of the world could happen anytime and caused by the smallest of human errors.




The Monks make for fantastic monsters, and I have a feeling they will go down as the most iconic of the Peter Capaldi era. The second part is the most Monk-heavy, and the concept is very unique. The Monks need a consent of love in order to invade a planet, and it must come from a person who represents a form of power. Offering permission to invade out of anything other than love and you're dead. In the show's entire fifty four year history it's a wonder there's never been a monster that asks for consent first before invading, and it's refreshing to see a monster different to your typical invaders in science-fiction.




I won't spoil the cliffhanger of this episode, but believe me: you won't see it coming. The consent of love comes from the most unlikely place, and it makes complete sense for the character involved. To me it is up there with the cliffhanger to Utopia; very high praise indeed given how much Utopia's final scenes were very much a punch the air moment.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
5
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6
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4
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Reviewed By: TCar96Review Date: 5/27/17 8:13 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Huge improvement on last week - first and foremost, this second part of what's starting to become a real monster of a three-parter, has a genuine plot. There's no information kept from the viewer arbitrarily to foster suspense and events run through in sequential order. It is shocking to identify this as a positive, and sadly reflects the scale of my gripes with the trend the show has taken these past couple of years.

Fortunately, the plot is remarkably unrelated to Extremis, with the Veritas' source still unexplained (part 3 perhaps?) and the monks still very much centre stage. The villains do suffer from some cliches well parodied in Gatiss' sketch show way back in the early 2000's. Lots of whispering 'Doc-tooor' and omnipotent abilities. Some new cliches appear too, with resemblance to the 'Silence' and a fantastic sounding rationale: 'fear is inefficient, we must be loved', that collapses into a pretentious puddle when actually dissected. A Sutekh type villain (heck, bring him back) would essentially push the plot in a similair direction with less head scratching.

Harness also is clearly back in the frame. We've got some concepts of representation and voting (Kill the Moon) with wishy washy contemporary political parallels to force through a general message of 'war = bad' (Zygon Invasion / Inversion). These themes aren't handled particularly in-depth or with much tact, but it's always welcome to see Doctor Who attempting to push beyond its usual borders. Frankly, I'd be far more satisfied if this was a two-parter, junking Extremis and giving these concepts some space to breathe. As it is, we're a bit compressed by the timeslot, with the Doctor solving the mystery (biological experimentation, not nuclear conflict) without any logical steps taken subsequent to an appraisal of evidence. He's the Doctor, he can just make these leaps.

One concept not welcome is the 'President of the World' shtick again, from the Series 8 finale. Watching the Doctor adopt such a mantle with ease is not only cringe inducing - with hokey dialogue and cheapo sets - but its wholly out of character, by Classic Who (President of Gallifrey) and New Who (never stops, never asks to be thanked) standards. There's a fun twist on the Doctor's fallibility towards the end though, very welcome.

As for production, sets again look cheap and the computer effects are wholly binary. The Pyramid work is astonishing, whilst submarines in the desert look like something knocked up on photoshop. The sets for the most part are atrociously cheap (is the Vault an excuse for reusing sets?) whilst the Monks, as last week, look absolutely top notch. Stunt PC casting is prevalent again, with one cast member at least bringing a laugh, albeit for reminding me of Phoenix Nights rather than any sense of foreboding! Direction is mostly uninspired, though there's another case of bizarre stylist choices (smashing bottle in blank space) and erratic editing (do we really need to be reminded about broken glasses minutes after their breaking?). Murray Gold is, after umpteen years, creatively bankrupt, reusing a riff from the Majestic Tale. Musical cues now half a decade old, are being used with reckless abandon. Being deafened by 12th's action theme is always a welcome tedium - especially as characters perform the astonishing feats of using a search engine.

Pains me to keep writing similair reviews, but it's heartbreaking to look back to the announcement that Peter would take the role. I was anxiously awaiting a new age for the show of a more dignified Doctor and a more cerebral take. More concepts, more character, less scale and less shlock. As it is, it's more of the same, Peter Capaldi playing an electric guitar with sonic sunglasses, making sexual innuendos with bland uninspired dialogue. Perhaps Big Finish continues to spoil me, but the gulf between what's been pumped out these last few years and a completely run of the mill monthly range release, is staggering.