Stories:
2892
Members:
732
Submitted Reviews:
8269
Reviewers:
342
< 3.10 - The Magician's Oath
3.12 - The Stealers from Saiph >

3.11 - The Mahogany Murderers

Rating Votes
10
35%
49
9
34%
48
8
23%
33
7
6%
8
6
2%
3
5
1%
1
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.9
Votes
143
Director:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: JMChurch25Review Date: 10/26/18 4:16 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

While technically not part of the official saga, 'Mahogany Murderers' serves as essentially the gentle backdoor pilot for Jago & Litefoot and their stories. Starting a few months after their first appearance in 'Talons', we are dropped into the Victorian setting of the time where Henry Gordon Jago and Professor George Litefoot are having dinner at the Red Tavern and catching up on separate events that eventually prove to be related to each other. Jago has taken control of the Alhambra Theatre while his normal place the Palace Theatre is under repairs while Litefoot continues following his passion for research. But when a strange body made of mahogany wood is found near the Thames and brought to Litefoot's attention, he calls upon Jago for assistance in finding out where it might have come from. Following a trail in Southwark to a small warehouse near the river, a strange man in fine wear, glasses, and a cane comes calling with a threatening physique and mysterious motives behind him. Electricity flickers, puppets begin moving, and a dark presence is at work in the heart of London with the pair of investigators thrown right in the middle. Almost immediately, I found myself becoming rather fond of both Jago and Litefoot as characters. Christopher Benjamin's Jago is theatrically flamboyant, somewhat arrogant, and a little bit chauvinistic. But he's still extremely likable and you can tell there's a brave and kind-hearted soul underneath all the bluster that Benjamin is brilliant at conveying. Baxter's Litefoot is at the opposite end of the spectrum being very grounded and analytical with an introverted eye for detail and frustrated skepticism. But he is also very enjoyable with a strong and good heart especially for what he cares for. They both feel very much like sophisticated trusted old friends and I never found their connection tiresome which is a very good sign. Being a Companion Chronicle and not a full cast story, the story and all of the minor characters are all narrated by Jago or Litefoot and sometimes it does get a little distracting / lost in translation with the various roles. But you as a listener are still able to follow it fine and it goes along at a nice medium pace. Their story-telling is also a lot of fun especially if you are a fan of long and descriptive language and especially the way the cliffhanger comes across between the two parts of the story is frankly hilarious. It all helps to support a frankly dark plot and something that is completely appropriate for this team even if the synopsis makes it a little bit too easy to figure out from the get go. Some of the other details of this world that Litefoot describes are also rather disturbing and makes it clear that this is a different world than the usual fair the Doctor might be found in. Andy Lane's script isn't quite perfect in that there are a few small narrative problems. There is way too much expository dialogue in explaining the circumstances of the plot especially near the end and the way it all ends is what I would almost consider to be a sudden anti-climax. It makes this story a little bit disconnected on the surface but having an idea of where the first series with this duo is going to go, I can live with that for this one. While it's not perfect and the climax might ruin it for some people, 'Mahogany Murderers' is a damn fun ride that strongly establishes Jago and Litefoot as a force to be reckoned with. It makes it abundantly clear that a spinoff series is needed for these two characters and thankfully that's exactly what we ended up getting. At the end of it's run time, it leaves you intensely curious and desperately wanting more of its title characters which is all I could've asked for and I left excited for the journeys to come. 

Other Recommendations

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 11/25/15 6:16 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This audio is the official pilot for the Jago & Litefoot series of Audio Dramas and is the first Companion Chronicle that doesn't feature the Doctor in any form. Christopher Benjamin and Trevor Baxter reunite for a mainly stand alone story which helps reintroduce us to the pair of infernal investigators after The Talons of Weng-Chiang and introduces us to who would become a series regular, barkeep Ellie Higson played by Lisa Bowerman. Bowerman doesn't really have much to do here except introduce the story as she serves Jago and Litefoot drinks so they can tell each other their stories She handles her minimal role with aplomb which shows just how good of an actor Bowerman is.

Benjamin and Baxter also give great performances picking up right where they left off and the chemistry is still there. Andy Lane's story is an extremely intriguing one and is steeped in the Victorian setting. Basically the villains are the Autons, but made out of wood and having a human consciousness. There is also talk of black magic and the score is chilling. The way the story is told allows for some comedy interjections and of course awesome alliteration.

The only real flaw with the story is that the framing could have been done a bit better and maybe have had Ellie listening in on the story instead of being the server of drinks.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: traves8853Review Date: 11/6/15 7:22 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

A prototype for the 'Jago & Litefoot' series, framed with the narration of the two characters in the form of a fireside chat in the Red Tavern. The titular characters are reunited and regal each other with their recent escapades, while discovering they haven’t been so far apart after all. Trevor Baxter and Christopher Benjamin are the single most important factor in the success of these characters and their interplay is full of charm and familiarity. There is a tight, fluid plot and the story is packed with plenty of vivid detail and Gothic imagery. This is one of those occasions where it just couldn't be any better.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 7/2/15 6:01 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This must have been the first playing around with the idea of the spin offs of Jago and Litefoot and it is without question one of the blueprint drama, It sets out the store of both the depth and quality of the characters original creation, it also demonstrates that in the capable hands of someone like Big Finish then they have now created a canon of work with these two characters who are without doubt the no.1 for me of spin offs. This story does not fail to deliver in fact with only the use of the two of the intrepid detectives of the supernatural and the unexplained, to tell the whole tale it speaks volumes of the whole production whether that be production, direction, writing or acting. Jago and Litefoot deliver on all fronts. The story recalls through recollection the macabre tale of a twisted genius bringing back to life the souls of the departed and implanting them into highly crafter wooden mannequins. The story telling held within this, is both a wonderfully engaging and a story that you will be hooked on until the end

Other Recommendations