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< 4.1 - The Drowned World
4.3 - The Prisoner of Peladon >

4.2 - The Glorious Revolution

Rating Votes
10
19%
20
9
18%
19
8
32%
33
7
18%
19
6
9%
9
5
2%
2
4
2%
2
3
0%
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2
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1
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Average Rating
8.1
Votes
104
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From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 8/12/15 5:47 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

I read in The Vault that Sydney Newman, disliked the idea of the Doctor being too sci-fi, and liked the more educational elemental vision, and really championed the historical episodes that the BBC put out, and disliked the Daleks and the like. Well old Sydney would have loved this. The standout of this is Frazer Hines, he is possibly the most polished all round performer I think of the Companion Chronicles. His characterisation of Patrick Troughton's Doctor 2 is both scarily accurate and also very authentically believable, to the point where you get the impression that Frazier could step into the role should Big Finish decided to put out some second Doctor releases and need an actor to reprise the role.


The story is warm. colourful and entertaining. Taking on the premises that there is a time anomaly that is traceable back to Jamie, a time investigator from the Time Lords is sent back to reprise his memory over the fact that Jamie had become embroiled in a potential historically damaging alteration to the whole British regency, by, interference, with, King James II court, due to Jamie obvious loyalty to his Scottish roots. Seeing an opportunity to maybe push history in a much more Celtic flavoured reality to the English throne, the investigator gets Jamie to retell by giving back his memories. The most moving parts, is when asked if he wants this to be a permanent memory, he refuses, and tells, of how he much prefers the life he has had, that he can remember.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
6
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/13/15 9:06 am
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

The Glorious Revolution is a very different sort of Second Doctor Story. Jamie McCrimmon was from the 18th Century and was the character least likely to be "In the know" when the Doctor arrives. This story takes a different tact as Jamie arrives in the 17th century and encounters a situation he's determined to change: The decisions of James VII to flee Scotland and the ascension of William in "The Glorious Revolution."

As Jamie points out, this revolution was glorious for the English because they had a change in power without bloodshed but for the Scots and Irish, it was anything but as the ascension William led to countless deaths and sufferings. However, Jamie's attempts to change his own timeline have some serious consequences.

The concept of this story is fascinating and the scene with Jamie and the Doctor argue with each other other (both voices done by Frazier Hines) is memorable. I do think the resolution does offer some problems. Jamie is too quick to concede to fixing the timeline and doesn't have any conflicted feelings about doing so.The framing story is that he's being interviewed about this situation by a Time Lord trying to figure out how he changed the timeline and the resolution to the framing story is odd. Still, the set up is good and this is a fairly insightful never made Troughton historical.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
4
Plot Rating:
2
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
3
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: komodoReview Date: 12/28/14 8:53 pm
0 out of 2 found this review helpful.

I found that there were two key assumptions made by the writers: First, that the listener is familiar with this ear of English history and secondly that we even care about it.

The Doctor has visited Tudor/Stewart times so often that it comes across as sad fanboy behavior from the writers.

The problems this lead to begin with the underlying assumption that the listener is well studied in English history and they lazily don't bother to tell the listener everything we need to hear. It feels cliquey and its hard to listen to as part of the story is missing. Then there is the assumption that we will care about the key characters. Perhaps the writers are great fans of King James II, but to a non-English listener he is nothing more than a name from another country's history. The assuption that the listener is already fascinated by the key characters leads to lazy story writing and an alienated listner.

I enjoyed exactly one minute of this story and that was when Jamie challenged all of these assumptions by viewing the so called glorious revolution from a non-English point of view. Sadly this was a fleeting moment.

To make it worse, the framing was awkward, illogical and ultimately pointless.

I'm glad I bought this on sale. I'd be happier if I hadn't.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
6
Plot Rating:
NR
Acting Rating:
NR
Replay Rating:
NR
Effects Rating:
NR
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: baticeerReview Date: 12/11/13 8:59 pm
2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

This is almost like Jamie's own version of "The Aztecs", a historical story where he has to struggle with the dilemma of changing the past. It is great to see Jamie in his element, because rather than the future, this story takes place not too long before his own time. I love the exploration of this lesser-known period of history and it also gives a new perspective of Jamie's background.

However, I have a few serious problems with this. One has to do with the framing story. I won't spoil it, but I thought that its ending was very out of character! That in mind, I'm not sure we even needed the frame... much of the story feels quite rushed, especially in the second half, so maybe the pacing would have been better if it wasn't there at all.

Frazer Hines gives a great performance as usual. His Troughton impression is amazing, although I wouldn't call it quite perfect.