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< 10.3 - Ministry of Peace
11.2 - Poison >

11.1 - Brother

Rating Votes
10
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9
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3
8
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6
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5
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Average Rating
6.5
Votes
11
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User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
10
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Unsure
Reviewed By: NannaSallyReview Date: 11/23/16 9:31 am
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

This is really 2 stories within a story… and is really about intolerance of people towards others just because of the way they look beyond their choice.

We have been told in past episodes that the Federation destroyed religious buildings and belief systems within their territories. But it would seem they have allowed a few, controlled cults to remain, perhaps a way to allow release of tensions in groups, before the wider use of sedatives in the air. A strange religious order from Earth is described – following ‘scrolls’ from the ‘Second Human Dynasty’, which accuse those suffering a particular disease of being a follower of Hoje – a kind of demon and now anyone showing signs of this syndrome are either killed outright or exiled.

The Liberator is taking Gustav Nyron back to Auron. He has discovered/remembered/revealed that he is actually a clone of the original Nyron, and he is determined to exact revenge on Servalan for the death of this original self.
Nyron had been married to a non-Auron, and their child was a sufferer of the disease. Nyron worked to find a cure – but instead found it has a different cause than expected.

He wakes to find himself abducted by Avon, and on a planet which seems familiar to him – the planet he lived on with his wife and son before riots destroyed all he loved.

Avon’s memories of his family history and his growing up are revealed in part – an obssessive, abusive father, a victimised mother. A rebellious older brother.

Avon had joined a Cleansing Mission, which the One Pure Race Organisation has arranged to destroy Hojes Sufferers – but his motives for being there were quite different from the rest of the members. Avon is after information that will help him with the fraud operation he is planning against the banking system.

The person he is meeting turns out to be his long-believed-dead brother Tor. – but I won’t tell you more cause it is full of Spoilers. BUT what will Avon decide to do with Tor? We are not actually told - maybe there is room here for a further tale.

Anthony Howell plays Gustav Nyrron, and he is really great. His performance involves great emotional depths and he is very, very good. His hesitation, his gasps of horror – all this and more.

Paul Darrow conveys the range of emotions he is and has gone through brilliantly. He also voices Father Gallus, the obssessive preacher and is quite convincing.

The sound effects are very good, the flashbacks work well. The music is not too distracting. The story is compelling and the writing tight.

So Questions: Is it reasonable to hate people just because of the way they look? Or any other reason for that matter? What should we do when a religion persuades its members to act against others in a violent way?

This story does give a glimpse of the Federation before the Intergalactic War and ways the powers-that-be controlled the population. But there is a hint that this cult no longer exists at least on eartt, when the series begins.

So, this could start a really interesting debate. Today we still have groups of people who are vilified because of things beyond their individual control and some people are just not prepared to believe this is the case.

I really like this episode, although it is not at all optimistic or pleasant. The acting, the issues, the writing - all work together well.

Thanks for reading,
see you tomorrow
Nanna Sally Nelson
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
3
Plot Rating:
2
Acting Rating:
7
Replay Rating:
1
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
Yes
Reviewed By: Queen DragonReview Date: 8/5/15 6:22 am
2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

I've listened to pretty nearly all the Liberator Chronicles, and I have to say this is the only one I have actually disliked. I did listen to the whole thing, but it took me three attempts, and if I hadn't paid for it, I doubt I would have bothered..

Why did I dislike it so? Well, there were several reasons. First of all, I am not a fan of the character of Nyrron, our go-to scientific genius in these plays, and when he bobbed up yet again, I immediately uttered a mental groan. I could, however, have coped with Nyrron if I could have worked out why the hell he had been shoehorned into this story in the first place. Second, it is supposed to be an Avon story, but Avon's past has been completely rewritten to the point where I began wondering if we were in an alternative universe. Here, he's been given a father who is some kind of religious maniac in a hoky cult and a brother who is even more of a genius than Avon. (Suddenly we're hip deep in geniuses.) I think it was when young Avon went off with the zealots on some kind of religious cleansing mission, mass murdering the victims of an incurable syndrome (yep, Avon) that I gave up on the play the first (or was it the second) time. However, Avon seemed to be playing a deeper game and while the zealots are merrily murdering the incurable syndrome victims during an opera concert (what do they have against opera lovers?) Avon manages to track down his brother, who, surprise! has the incurable syndrome as does, surprise! Nyrron's son. Nyrron was trying to find a cure (the story appears to veer, at this point, into a heavy handed comment on gay rights) but the syndrome turns out to be genetic, and thus irreversible, all of which is rather strange given that Nyrron is from Auron, and, one would have thought, genetically distinct from humans.

Ultimately this is a confused story which bears very little resemblance to Blake's 7 as I know it. If I wasn't listening to Paul Darrow's voice, I doubt I'd recognise the character he was playing as Avon, and I find that really annoying. We know that Avon had a brother because he's alluded to in Spacefall. This play tries to give the brother a back story, but it's not one that I can believe in.