Stories:
2949
Members:
741
Submitted Reviews:
8571
Reviewers:
349
< 1.2 - Deadly Departed
1.4 - Clubbed to Death >

1.3 - A Clone of My Own

Rating Votes
10
0%
0
9
0%
0
8
33%
2
7
50%
3
6
17%
1
5
0%
0
4
0%
0
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
7.1
Votes
7

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
7
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
8
Replay Rating:
7
Effects Rating:
7
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 5/30/15 5:57 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Tiger Ninestein isn't the most lovable lead character a program ever had. In every episode of Terrahawks, he's biting everyone's head off and being generally unpleasant as he protects Earth from the Android Zelda. This story takes a greater exploration of the character.

Ninestein is one of nine clones created by Doctor Stein to find out if these clones would be the same person or develop or their own personality. The Government short-circuited this and decided and take one of the clones who showed the best promise and make him a military leader who would lead Earth. The other clones were released to live their own lives but if Ninestein were dead, one of them could be called for and have their mind wiped and Ninestein's consciousness put in to ensure the defense of Earth. This had already happened once.

Zelda begins to kill off Ninestein's clones leading Ninestein to try to find them and keep them close at hand so that one will be ready to have their Mindwiped if Zelda kills him.

I have to admit that I really didn't care for the first half of the episode,. It was just kind of unpleasant and drawn out scenes of Zelda killing off clones and Ninestein being annoying around headquarters, particularly in the early scene where Mary wanted to go to the beach and Ninestein had stated he wanted to go but needed to finish his video game. I wondered if he they hadn't gotten beach trip time in the 2 1/2 years that Zelda had been away.

The episode then improves as Mary calls Ninestein out on how cold he's being (I noticed from the first time I heard him) and challenges his whole clone must replace me system and points out that other military organization manage to survive without this apparatus. The Sergeant Major refuses to follow one of Ninestein's orders because it violates his programming. There are moral and ethical debates called up. With the more "cartooney" voices still being used, it felt like this show after decades was questioning some of its overall premises which is a fascinating place to go.

The final scene has a lot of drama in it and it's revealed that Zelda's plan was far more cunning than the somewhat typical villainous plan we seemed to be witnessing. The story gives us insight into why Ninestein is such a cold hearted character while not excusing it.

Jeremy Hitchen deserves credit for putting in greater voice duty than usual as he plays not only Ninestein, but Professor Stein and several other clones. He manages to make them similar but still different. Overall, despite a rocky start, this is still a worthwhile episode.