Stories:
2827
Members:
711
Submitted Reviews:
7672
Reviewers:
327
< Psychodrome
The Last Adventure - The End of the Line >

Iterations of I

Rating Votes
10
33%
21
9
33%
21
8
16%
10
7
14%
9
6
2%
1
5
0%
0
4
2%
1
3
0%
0
2
0%
0
1
0%
0
Average Rating
8.8
Votes
63
Director:
Writer:

Purchase From:

Latest Community Reviews

From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
9
Plot Rating:
9
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: GibbyBloggerReview Date: 4/15/16 4:09 pm
0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

I'm going to be honest, it was a little confusing at first (maths hurts my brain...), but once you get past all that, it's a really enjoyable story with interesting developments the whole way through.

Together with 'Psychodrome', this short-lived TARDIS team is given a new lease of life, recapturing the essence of the early-80s and even making some of the less likeable characters... actually very likeable.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
10
Plot Rating:
10
Acting Rating:
10
Replay Rating:
10
Effects Rating:
10
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: newt5996Review Date: 8/19/15 4:36 pm
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Iterations of I is a story that wouldn't feel out of place in Season 19 alongside the other stories. The story gives each companion time to be fleshed out with Nyssa falling under the influence of the I, Adric getting shot in the leg and Tegan helping turn everything all right. The villain of the piece is the I, an imaginary number that has gained sentience due to the meddling of a cult searching for God in numbers. The idea of God in numbers is a great idea that makes a sort of sense and the cultists finding an all powerful being in a number works extremely well. Adric and Nyssa are both in their elements as the scientists of the TARDIS team. Adric really gets to shine in this play due to the fact that Dorney remembers that Alzarians can heal quickly and uses Adric as an alien and not a human.
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
7
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
9
Effects Rating:
9
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: kfb2014Review Date: 6/8/15 5:03 pm
1 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Iterations of I by John Dorney

This is the second story on this two production release. This is from the start a well crafted, superbly produced, wonderfully rich product you really wonder how Big Finish, can do what they do, which to to be frank, is paint the most amazing pictures in your imagination, and then tell extend the pleasure by injecting your favourite timelord without it missing a beat. This instalment is unquestionably attempting to show us that Dorney is the main man when it comes to writing some of the best Doctor Who Audio around. He has done himself no dis-service here with this outing, it like painting with the use of language, heavily textured and amazing use of grammer. The subject is highly technical in that it bases the whole plot around the ideology of numbers, having physical form or at least wanting them. The characters in this production really do shine, the supporting cast are exceptional and really dp make this drama feel more than just a standard Main Release with No.5. The introduction of Adric as well gives it that extra nostalgic feel. Judging by the time and effort alone in this release you can tell that there is a massive amount of intracate structure, the whole thing plays out for just over 2 hours long, and I for one felt like it was not a third that long. The story telling just melts away as you listen.

Peter is very much like his TV characterisation maybe hearing Adric's dulcet tones makes it feel more of its time, maybe it is the amazing use of the period, early monologue synth sounds, who knows but Peter is certainly more like his TV character than perhaps he is in the main range releases. Here he is left to explore that period of the 5th Doctor. Again the same is true of Nyssa and Tegan, the two girls come across as being friends because of their occupancy of the TARDIS as opposed to them being friends if there were not. I find the almost droid like manner of Adric very much a blast from his performance from the BBC. So for authenticity and originality then it is the Adric from old. So for preset they will love this. I for one would have liked them to explore a more developed Adric. One that has learnt from his mistakes, and, has a much more grown up, not the sort of precious teenager genius that he plays. That aside on minor criticism's this second of the two stories is 5 out of 5
From the Reviewer:
User Rating:
8
Plot Rating:
8
Acting Rating:
9
Replay Rating:
8
Effects Rating:
8
Has Prerequisite(s):
No
Reviewed By: adamelijahReview Date: 4/13/15 9:18 am
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Adric attempts to pilot the TARDIS and lands on a mysterious Irish Island with a "haunted house" where a cult that believed God was a number set out to find him and now are all dead. The crew and a few locals find themselves menaced by a psychotic sentient number or more properly a monster that haunts a psychotic number.

This is absolutely fantastic idea by writer John Dorney and one that really seems best-suited to audio. There are some delightfully bad number puns, particularly when the Fifth Doctor examines their dire situation at the end of Part Three and declares, "I'm afraid our number may be up." There are also some lovely Irish accents and it's pretty rare for the show to use Ireland as a setting.

The downside is a rushed conclusion in Part Four with a couple contrivances. Adric' s healing factor is almost at the level of Wolverine. Also Tegan's character is a bit on the annoying side though the Doctor gets in a few nicely sarcastic lines that are pretty fun. As there was at least a plausible enough explanation for everything, so I'll give this one an 8/10.